Add Batman: The Killing Joke

I am trying to get a group of people to petition for Batman: The Killing Joke comic book and movie to be added to the app.

6 Likes

I wouldn’t mind seeing the movie but don’t particularly care.

The lack of a comic is peculiar. Perhaps they feel they are making too much on hard copies to include it here?

I’m extremely grateful for the DCU app and will pay for the access in perpetuity for the current deal alone, but I would enjoy seeing The Killing Joke added to the library.

It had been available for free on Sony Crackle for a while, but it’s no longer there. Might as well bring it here.

^That last comment was in reference to the film. As for the comic…why not include the original edition here? That way, they’re not competing with the recolored Deluxe Edition.

1 Like

The problem I could see with doing the original colored edition is that there’s a good chance that they don’t have that digitally available, so doing it that way would just make more work for them.

Killing Joke is deemed a graphic novel and DC has pretty much said GN aren’t coming anytime soon.

4 Likes

The worst comic of all time.
The worst story of all time.
The worst art of all time.

1 Like

@dogwelder9
Ahh… someone else gets it.

1 Like

It certainly is the worst Joker origin story of all time.

1 Like

Okay, I could get not liking the story or the darker content, but saying Brian Bolland’s art is bad? That’s a bridge too far, man.

6 Likes

The prologue to the Killing Joke was against everything Batgirl and Batman stood for, as student and mentor.

The book originated at a Graphic Novel so will not be in our library until DC Comics renegotiates contract with DCU.

1 Like

@Jay_Kay
It’s good VISUAL art, but bad sequential art. The panels don’t flow very well. I love a Brian Bolland cover, but his internals aren’t great.

1 Like

@DeSade_Acolyte what do you think is better? I really liked that one (as most people did) i thought the mad love(i think was the name of that story) was ok but i preferred killing joke.

1 Like

I’d take the 40’s red hood origin. Or mad love (because we know that origin isn’t true, just a story to manipulate Harley. Or The Jokers 5 way revenge.

The Joker shouldn’t have an origin. It’s better we don’t know him before being The Joker. We don’t need to know “why”. We just need to know that he is nuts. I also think the Bronze Age Joker is much more terrifying. As Denny O’Neil put it, “If you meet the Joker on the street he might kill you or give you a thousand dollars. He’ll probably kill you, but you can’t be sure. That is a true agent of chaos. That is terrifying. He literally has no rules. Which makes him a better foil for Batman. Not knowing what he will do next.

I prefer and strongly believe the Joker is a sociopath, not a psychopath. He is one of the sanest characters in DC lore. He knows what he’s doing isn’t socially acceptable and just does not care at all.

So trying to give him a backstory works against his villainous nature. I think the truth is he remembers Batman and falling into the vat but that’s it. Even he doesn’t know who he used to be and doesn’t care. The Joker came into the world “fully formed”. He is what he is and he loves every minute of it.

4 Likes

I would love that. Ive been wanting to read and watch it for a while

1 Like

The Killing Joke is not above criticism, but there is something I really appreciate about it. As much as the book is associated with the post-Crisis era, it actually seems to function more as a parallel to Moore’s “Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?” two-parter. Batman and Joker have run out of time because they’re no longer in a universe that allows for their game to continue. The writing is on the wall for them (and that writing just happens to be The Dark Knight Returns, a story that hangs over late 80s Batman stories like an ominous fog), and this story is the last chance to dial back the insanity.

We see Commissioner Gordon going through scrapbooks and reminiscing about the Golden Age. We see Batman plop down a Joker card beside an idyllic group portrait from the Silver Age–a portrait that dares to include Dick Grayson’s Robin (the only reference to any Boy Wonder in the story), Batwoman, Bat-Girl, Bat-Mite, and Ace the Bat-Hound in open defiance of the Crisis reboot. Barbara Gordon’s violation feels like an assault on the now-defunct Bronze Age, as if the shift in tone seen in the Bat-books of the time were itself an act of unspeakable villainy.

For all of the potential Moore saw in the revamped DC universe (as seen in the rather optimistic ending of the Crisis tie-in story from Swamp Thing), he also treats it as a corruption of the upbeat classic universe, with villains from Mxyzptlk to the Joker taking advantage of the circumstances to reinvent themselves in horrific ways and to cross lines that never should have been crossed. Modernity proves to be deadly for our heroes’ most beloved allies. The only difference is that when Moore killed off Jimmy Olsen and Lana Lang, they were retconned back to life immediately. When he paralyzed Batgirl, it stuck for 23 years.

3 Likes

Please no. This is the one story DC should def keep off the platform. It’s the poster child for over the top depictions of violence against woman. Even Moore is not a fan of it.

1 Like

It’s a graphic novel, so it’s not coming here anytime soon. The more I’ve read it and seen the film, the more I see it as a disservice to a great character. He loses his sense of chaos, that is essential and more frightening and dangerous.

Making the Joker a psychopath rather than a sociopath, weakens the character.

2 Likes

I really don’t care about TKJ. Moore really doesn’t care about it either. Why do people keep calling it a masterpiece? Doesn’t just ruin the Joker, it also effectively ruined Barbara Gordon until John Ostrander came in and reminded everyone how awesome she is with Oracle.

1 Like

Bumb