DC comic book recomendations

Pls just anything thatll be interesting n get me into comics. I havent read much btq

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Some classic Batman:
Batman (1940-) #1-4 followed by Batman: The Long Halloween #1-13 them Batman: Dark Victory #0-13

Some more modern Batman:
Batman (2011-) #1-11

My favorite Superman origin:
Superman: Secret Origin #1-6

Really funny, dark political satire:
The Flintstones #1-12

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For a lot more options and detailed descriptions, search “where to start” and click on News. There’s a ton of really good articles there.

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Comic books that have the year 2011 (new 52) and 2016
(rebirth) at the end of their titles are reboots that require little background knowledge.

My favorite stories arcs are

Detective 2016
Superman 2016

Wonder Woman 2016 odd numbered issues Year One

Aquaman 2011

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For a complete list of Start Reading articles

Go to Support

And

Click on

Making News Section
Where to Start
Reading Articles Easily
Available
Last reply 7h ago

TurokSonOfStone
1950

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@Awesome_Squid

I didnt know Search included News

That is new.

But output is limited.

Even if I put in Start Reading Batman I dont get article.

Where to Start Reading Batman
Comics
Joshua Lapin-Bertone
thursday April 11

Batman is everywhere these
days- games, toys, and countless other medie And the Dark Knight gains new comic book readers with his every appearance. If you’re just starting to read the Batman’s adventures and wondering where to begin, we’ve got a few ideas that may help. Just click on the links below to start your reading adventure.

Batman: Year One

THE STORY: Batman: Year One
is a modern retelling of the Dark
Knight’s origin, which has gone
on to become one of the most
celebrated comics in the medium. The story is about two
men, Bruce Wayne and Jim
Gordon. and how their arrival in the corrupt city of Gotham shakes the underworld. Bruce seeks to eradicate crime by becoming a masked vigilante; Jim wants to clean up the crooked police department. The two men eventually realize their missions won’t succeed unless they put aside their differences and work together. This masterpiece was written by Frank Miller and brilliantly penciled by David Mazzucchelli.

FOR FANS OF: The 2005
Batman Begins film and Fox’s
Gotham both took many of
the best elements from Batman:
Year One and brought them to
live-action life.

WHATS NEXT check out the Legends of the Dark Knight comic-book series. It picks up where"Year One" left off and tells a series of self-contained tales about Batman’s earliest adventures each of them crafted by some of the top creators in comics. And Frank Miller’s groundbreaking masterpiece (which be both wrote and illustrated) Batman The Dark Knight Returns is required reading for ALL pop culture fans. (It arrives on DC Universe on Tuesday, April 16th.)

WHERE TO FIND IT: Batman
#404-407

BONUS: Did you know that
Warner Brothers produced an
animated adaptation of Batman:
Year One in 2011? Fans of Fox’s
Gothamwill recognize Ben
McKenzie as the voice of Bruce
Wayne. Bryan Cranston did an
inspired job voicing Jim Gordon,
and. thanks to the aninmation
evoking Mazzucchelli’s pencils,
this is one of DC’s very best
animated films.

Batman Year two

THE STORY A costumed serial
killer named the Reaper is
slaying Gotham’s citizens and
evading the Dark Knight at
every turn. Batman wonders if
it’s time to rethink his “no guns,
no killing” policy and starts
carrying a firearm. As if the
Reaper wasn’t enough to deal
with, Bruce Wayne finds his
heart torn apart when he falls in
love with a girl named Rachel
and comes face to face with the
man who killed his parents.

Writer Mike W. Barr tells a
Batman story that breaks all the
rules, and leaves you guessing
what will happen next right up
until the final chapter.

FOR FANS OF: If you enjoyed
the animated Batman: Mask of
the Phantasm you’ll be thrilled
to discover some of the movie’s
best beats were inspired by this
Comic.

WHAT’S NEXT: Batman: Year
Three is the next chapter in the
chronicles of the Dark Knight’s
early career. And if you love the
team of writer Mike W. Barr and
penciler Alan Davis, check out
Detective Comics #574 another classic take on Batman’s origin that the two teamed up on, as well as the duo’s run on Batman and the Outsiders, starting with issue #21.

WHERE TO FIND IT Detective
Comics #575-578

BONUS: Some of this story’s chapters were illustrated
by a young Todd McFarlane, the
creator of Spawn.

Batman: Hush

THE STORY: A mysterious
bandaged villain begins
manipulating the people in
Batman’s life, setting the Dark
Knight up for one of his biggest
mysteries. Along the way,
Batman finds himself falling for
Catwoman, who is all too eager
to reciprocate those feelings.
But can Batman truly trust his
emotions when Hush is pulling
the strings? Batman: Hush is a
great primer on the Dark
Knight’s world, with new-reader
friendly introductions to most of
Gotham’s key heroes and
villains. Writer Jeph Loeb crafts
amystery with enough twists
and turns to keep even the
greatest of detectives guessing,
while artist Jim Lee illustrates
some of the most iconic images
of Batman and his allies in
recent history.

FOR FANS OF: Do the Batman
and Catwoman scenes from
Batman Returns warm your
heart? Are you shipping Bruce
and Selina in Fox’s Gotham? lf
you’re a fan of Batman and
Catwoman’s romance, then
you’ll love this story!

WHAT’S NEXT: This story sets
the stage for the return of the
second Robin, Jason Todd. who
had died in the classic “A Death
in the Family” storyline. If you’d
like to see how that goes down,
check out the classic"Under the
Hood. )

WHERE TO FIND IT Batman
#608-619

BONUS: Warner Brothers wil
release an animated film
adaptation of Batman: Hush this
summer, making this the perfect
time to read the fan-favorite
story.

“Daughter of the Demon”

THE STORY: When Robin is
kidnapped, Batman is
approached by a man named
Ra’s al Ghul, whose daughter
Talia has also been kidnapped.
(Batman had met Talia in
Detective Comics #411’s"Into
the Den of the Death
Dealers!") The two men agree to
work together to find their
missing loved ones in a journey
that takes the Dark Knight
across the globe. This issue
introduces the rivalry between
Ra’s and the Caped Crusader.
In the Bronze Age of comics,
writer Denny O’ Neil and atist
Neal Adams redefined the
Batman from the campy figure
in the 1966 Batman TV series
into a dread avenger of the
night. This story is one of the
high points of their legendary
run.

FOR FANS OF: Batman: The
Animated Series patterned its
tone after this issue’s era,
drawing heavy inspiration from
the stories of O’Neil and Adams,
which featured a grimly
determined Batman. but one
who still possessed a sly sense
of humor. When you read their
classic stories, you’ll feel like
you’re watching an episode of
the show.

WHAT’S NEXT: If you love the
team of Denny O’Neil and Neal
Adams check out their
collaboration on Batman #234
which features one of the
best Two-Face stories. If you
want to see Batman and Ra’s
second encounter. then be sure
to read the O’Neil scripted Batman #235 O’Neil and Adams both returned to Ra’s for an epic two-parter in issue #243 and issue #244.

WHERE TO FIND IT Batman
#232

BONUS: Check out the Batman
The Animated Series episode
“The Demon’s Quest” which
brilliantly adapts this issue

Batman: The Long Halloween
(Arriving on DC Universe on
Tuesday, April 16th)

THE STORY: Set in the early
days of Batman’s career, the
Dark Knight teams up with Jim
Gordon and District Attorney
Harvey Dent to stop the
mysterious Holiday Killer.
Nobody knows who this
murderer is, but on each holiday
they leave behindanew
victim. The case becomes more
complicated when Harvey Dent
falls from grace and begins to
transform into the villainous Two-Face. Writer Jeph Loebtells an eerie whodunit, one perfectly
complimented by the moody art
of Tim Sale. Together, Loeb and
Sale wound up telling one of the
most unforgettable Batman
sagas of the Modern Age.

FOR FANS OF: Christopher
Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy
borrowed some elements from
this story, including Harvey
Dent’s fall from grace and the
intrigue from Carmine Falcone
and Gotham’s crime families.

WHAT’S NEXT: Jeph Loeb and
Tim Sale reunited to craft a
sequel to this story called
Batman: Dark Victory, The
sequel picked up where The
Long Halloween’s crime saga
left off, adding a mysterious new
killer and introducing the first
Robin, Dick Grayson.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Batman:
The Long Halloween #1-13

BONUS: Are you a gamer? The
video game Batman: Arkham
City features an unlockable skin
for Catwoman based on Tim
Sale’s design for the character in
this story. Meow!

Batman: Strange Apparitions

THE STORY. This classic run of
Bronze Age Batman stories
features the Dark Knight going
up against mob boss Rupert
Thorne, mad professor Hugo
Strange, and the Clown Prince
of Crime himself The
Joker. Italso introduces Silver
St. Cloud, setting up Bruce
Wayne’s first truly adult
romance, The team of writer
Steve Englehart and artist
Marshall Rogers didn’t have a
very long run on Detective
Comics, but in their short time
together they wound up
producing some of Batman’s
most memorable Bronze Age
stories. This thrilling run of
stories also features the work of
famed writer Len Wejin and
celebrated artist Walt
Simonson.

FOR FANS OF This is another
run of comics that Batman: The
Animated Series fans will
love. Many elements from this
era, including mob boss Rupert
Thorne, helped build the status
quo for the TV favorite. And
devotees won’t regret checking
out the tales that inspired
their favorite cartoon.

WHAT’S NEXT: If you’re curious
Rupert Thorne/Hugo Strange
feud. check out Detective
Comics #513. The saga gets
even more (pardon the pun)
strange!

WHERE TO FIND IT Writer
Steve Englehart comes on board
with Detective Comics #469-
479, but things really get
cooking when artist Marshall
Rogers joins him for issue #471
through the team’s fınal issue,
#476.

BONUS: Check out the Batman:
The AnimatedSeries episode
The Laughing Fish which
adapts Detective Comics #475

“The Court of Owls”

THE STTORY: Batman knows
Gotham like the back of his
hand, and there aren’t many
secrets the city can keep from
him. So how can a secret society
be operating for ages right
under his nose? Who are the
Court of Owls, and can they
have mnore control over Gotham
than Batman does? See the Dark
Knight solve the mystery he
didn’teven know existed in this
blockbuster tale from writer
Scott Snyder and artist Greg
Capullo.

FOR FANS OF: Did you enjoy
the “Court of Owls” saga
in season 3 of Fox’s Gotham?
Were you intrigued by their
cameo in the Young Justice:
Outsiders episode"True
Heroes? Are youa fan of
conspiracy stories and secret
societies? If the answer to any of these questions is "yes, then
this is the story for you!

WHAT’S NEXT: To see what
happens next, check out “Night
of The Owls” (Batman #8-12),
the next chapter in Scott Snyder
and Greg Capullo’s epic Batman
run

WHERE TO FIND IT: Batman
(2011) #1-7

BONUS: If you enjoyed this
story, be sure to watch the 2015
animated film Batman vs. Robin,
which brought the Court of
Owls into the DC animated
universe.

“To Kill a Legend”

THE STORY: The Phantom
Stranger sends Batman and
Robin to a parallel world where
ayoung version of Bruce Wayne
hasn’t lost his parents yet. Robin
isn’t sure if they should
interfere. After all, doesn’t
this world need a Batman? But
Bruce Wayne isn’t about to sit
back and let his parents die
again…or is he?“To Kill A
Legend” celebrated Detective
Comics 500th issue with a story
that questioned what it means
to be a hero. Writer Alan
Brennert’s single-issue story is a
favorite of many Batfans, who
still ponder its implications to
this very day.

FOR FANS OF: If you enjoy tales
of alternate realities and/or
philosophical questions then
this story is for you. If this comic
feels like an episode of The
Twili Zone, don’t be too
surprised…Alan Brennert was a
frequent writer for the show in
its 1980s incarnation.

WHAT’S NEXT: If you love Alan
Brennert’s take on alternate
realities. check out the
writer’s Brave and the Bold
#197 a Batman tale set on
Earth-Two, where the Dark
Knight marries Catwoman!

WHERE TO FIND IT Detective
Comics #500

BONUS: Did you know that Alan
Brennert also wrote for the
1970’s Wonder Woman TV
series? Check out"Disco
Devil one of his most
memorable episodes.

HONORABLE MENTION
Batman: The Dark Knight
Returns

The defning work of writer-
artist Frank Miller’s career. and
in the eyes of many the fınest
Batman story every crafted, is
the 1986 four-issue linmited
series Batman: The Dark Knight
Returns. It’s certainly excellent enough to be the fiırst
Batman comic a new fan
reads, but its story- a much older Bruce Wayne coming out of retirement to don the mantle of the Bat one last time probably resonates even more powerfully if one has read a few of the above titles first.

Where to Start Reading Justice
League Comics
Joshua Lapin-Bertone
Tuesday May 7

The DC Universe is full of world-
threatening super-villains, and
sometimes it takes more than
one hero to defeat them.

Citizens can sleep peacefully,
however. because the Justice
League is Earth’s first line of
defense. Comprised of the
World’s Greatest Super Heroes,
the League has saved countless
lives since its debut in 1960.
With most of its adventures
now available to enjoy on DC
Universe, there’s never been a
better time to dive into the
League’s rich history. Whether
you grew up in the 70s and 80s
watching the Super Friends
cartoon or were introduced to
the team through its 2001
animated series, there’s a
Justice League comic book for
you. Here are some great places
to start reading…

“New World Order”

THE STORY: When a group of
aliens known as the Hyperclan
makes its way to Earth,
Superman grows suspicious of
its intentions. These strange
visitors claim they want to help,
but the Justice League soon
learns they aren’t what they
appear to be… This story
launched 1997’s title. DC’s
flagship series in the late 1990’s.
After years of lineups featuring
second stringers, the Justice
League now had its most iconic
heroes back in its roster. Writer
Grant Morrison and artist
Howard Porter’s depiction of
the White Martians inspired
subsequent portrayals in shows
like Young Justiceand Supergirl.

FOR FANS OF This run is
written by Grant Morrison,
whose run on the Doom Patrol
comic inspired DC Universe’s Doom Patrol Morrison is also
responsible for comic book
classics like AlI-Star Superman and Batman and Son,
among many others.

WHAT’S NEXT: The rest of
Grant Morrison’s JLA run is well
worth reading. He also put the
team up against their criminal
counterparts from another
universe in the graphic
novel JLA: Earth 2.

WHERE TO FIND IT: JLA#1-4

BONUS: Check out the Justice
League pilot episode “Secret
Origins” for a take on the team’s
origin that’s heavily influenced
by this tale, as the heroes go up
against a group of alien beings
similar to the Hyperclan.

Justice League of America
#100-102

THESTORY: The Justice
League’s joyous 10Oth meeting
is cut short when the
team learns the Justice
Society is in danger on Earth-
Two. The League and the Justice Society then unite to search time and space for the Seven Soldiers of Victory, who may be their only hope in saving the Universe. Writer Len Wein (at
the height of his formidable
powers) begins his run on the
book with one of the most
memorable DC team-ups ever.
This story is seen by many as the Justice League’s “graduation” from the Silver Age into the Bronze Age, a more intense era Bronze Age, with higher drama

FOR FANS OF: The Justice
Society, dimension- and time-
hopping tales, and team-up
epics!

WHAT’S NEXT: Read Wein’s
entire run, through issue
114; or, for Wein’s next epic
team-up of the Justice League
and Justice Society, jump right
to Justice League of America
#107-108,

WHERE TO FIND IT: Justice
League of America 100-102

Justice League of America
192-193

THE STORY: The Justice League
is caught off guard when
they’re attacked by their
teammate Red Tornado. It turns
out the android’s creator,
Professor T.O. Morrow, is trying
to counteract a prophecy that
ends with his own death. The
League must unite to stop
Morrow and save the Tornado
from his inventor’s wicked
influence. Along the way, the
Tornado’s true origin is at last
revealed… Writer Gerry
Conway and artist George
Perez’s depiction of the League
is among the most iconic of the
“Satellite Era” (named after the
team’s Bronze Age
headquarters).

FOR FANS OF: Readers who
loved The New Teen Titans
Crisis on Infinite Earths, or the
1987 Wonder Woman comic
will appreciate George Perez penciling another one of
DC’s most iconic titles. Perez’s
Justice League also paved the
way for the fondly remembered
Super Powers toy line and comic
book as well as the Super
Powers cartoon.

WHAT’S NEXT: The Conway-
Perez run begins with issue
#184 (continuing a story
Conway began in #183) and-
barring a handful of fill-in artist
ISSues- – continues throughthe
landmark anniversary issue
#200… For the next incarnation
of the team. check out Justice
League of America Annual#2, in
which Aquaman unites a diverse
new team of heroes. This era is
affectionately known as"Justice
League Detroit," and introduces
some fan-favorite characters
like Vibe and Steel who feature
in several of DC’s current live-
action TV shows.

WHERE TO FIND IT Justice
League of America #192-193

BONUS: Red Tornado’s origin
story was incorporated into the
first season of the Young Justice animated series.

“Tower of Babel”

THE STORY: People have often
said that Batman has a
contingency plan for everything,
but what happens when those
plans fall into the wrong hands?
Ra’s Al Ghul strikes at the
Justice League, and, thanks to
the Dark Knight’s plans, he’s
able to bring the team to
its knees. How can the Justice
League overcome this
demoralizing defeat, and
can they go on after their trust
in Batman has been shattered?
The stakes have never been
higher in this blockbuster story
from writer Mark Waid and
artist Howard Porter, as our
heroes face a turning point that
rocks them to their core.

FOR FANS OF: The Dark Knight
takes center stage in this tale, so
Batfans will love it. If you’ve
ever been in a nerdy debate
about Batman’s “prep time,”
then this is the storyline for you!
Fans of writer Mark Waid - who
also produced superlative work
in Kingdom Come and
Superman: Birthright – will also
be enraptured.

WHAT’S NEXT: Read the series
through JLA#50 to find out how
Batman regains the League’s
trust. Then enjoy Waid’s
retelling of the League’s early
days in JLA: Year One.
WHERE TO FIND IT: JLA#43-
46.

BONUS: This storyline inspired
the 2012 animated film Justice
League: Doom, which reunited
the cast from the Justice League animated series.

Starro the Conqueror!"

THE STORY: Journey back to
the early days of the Silver Age
and experience the Justice
League’s first appearance! The
League’s first outing puts them
against an alien being known as
Starro the Conqueror. Starro
might look like a giant starfish,
but his battle with the League
is no joke, and inspired many
homages. In the Justice League’s debut adventure, writer
Gardner Fox introduces
Snapper Carr, a teen sidekick
who went on to have his own
legacy in the greater DC
Universe.

FOR FANS OF: If you grew up
watching the Super Friends, this
Comic will feel like a blast from
your past. If you appreciate the
sleek, clear, midcentury lines of
the Silver Age, you’ll be in
heaven with artist Mike
Sekowsky’s minimalist work.

WHAT’S NEXT: After
reading the League’s fırst
appearance, enjoy the rest of
the Fox-Sekowsky run in The
Brave and the Bold #29 and
#30, continuing in Justice
League of America#1through
#63.

WHERE TO IND ITThe Brave
and the Bold 28

BONUS: Check out the Batman:
The Brave and the Bold two-
parter The Siege of Starro" to
see how DC’s heroes fare
against the titular alien’s
animated incarnation.

“A New Beginning”

THE STORY: The Justice League
is here to save the day…if they
can get their act together! In the
wake of 1986’s Legends event,
Guy Gardner tries to take
command of the team, Captain
Marvel has the maturity of a
young boy, and Batman
and Martian Manhunter try to
keep everything together. This
incarnation of the team was
notable for its humor, care of
writers J.M. DeMatteis and
Keith Giffen, along with the
League’s globe-trotting
adventures. The “beyond
America” focus caused the book
to be retitled Justice League
to be retitled Justice League
Internationaland spawneda
series of successful spin-off
titles.
FOR FANS OF: Readers who
enjoyed the recent Shazam
movie ewill be pleased to see
Captain Marvel heavily featured
in this story. In fact, this title was
one of the first times the
character was portrayed as
a kid in an adult’s body. Comedy
fans and those who prefer
lighthearted stories will also be
pleased to discover this book
has a far less serious tone than
other Justice League titles.

WHAT’S NEXT: Writer Keith
Giffen’s run on the
title continues through issue
#60 This series was sob
successful that Giffen created a
spin-off book - Justice League
Europe.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Justice
League #1-7

BONUS: This story contains a
moment when Batman knocks
Guy Gardner out with one
punch. Gardner’s resulting
embarrassment became a long-
running gag in the DC Universe
and was even parodied in the
Batman: The Brave and the Bold
episode The Eyes of Despero.

Justice League: The Nail

THE STORY: Many readers
know the story of how Jonathan
and Martha Kent found baby
Kal-El’s rocketship and raised
him to be the world’s greatest
super hero. But what if the
Kents hadn’t found the infant?
What if a single nail ruptured
their car’s tire and changed the
destiny of the entire planet?
Writer-artist Alan Davis tellsa
dark Elseworlds tale that looks
at what the Justice League-
and the DC Universe would be
without Superman.

FOR FANS OF: This story is a
must-read for fans of alternate
universe tales and anybody who
has ever devoured a DC
Elseworlds title. As well as those
who love Alan Davis’ superlative
art in Batman and the
Outsiders#22 through #36
and Detective Comics (#569
through #575)

WHAT’S NEXT: This story
continues in the sequel Justice
League of America: Another
Nail Other DC Elseworlds
books featuring the Justice
League include the Lord of the
Rings-styled League of Justice.

HONORABLEMENTIONS:

Although their scope goes
beyond the roster of the Justice
League, no list of JLA classics
would be complete without a
mention of the late cartoonist
Darwyn Cooke’s masterfull
retelling of the Silver Age in DC:
The New Frontier and writer
Mark Waid and artist Alex Ross’
vildly influential deconstructionist epic Kingdom Come.

Where to Start Reading Aquaman
Comics

Joshua Lapin-Bertone
July 16, 2019

There’s a whole world of
outrageous adventure under the sea, where Aquaman protects
his kingdom and fights for
his people. Perhaps you met
Arthur Curry via the ‘Super
Friends’ cartoon or were
blown away by Jason
Momoa’s portrayal in the
recent DC live-action
‘Aquaman’ movie. Whether
you’re a fan of Aquaman’s
old school heroism or his
modern badass persona,
there’s a comic for you! With an entire ocean full of digital comics, it can be easy to drown in them, but with the following handy guide you’ll be swimming in underwater epics before
you know it. Here’s our list
of recommended Aquaman
comics for beginners…

“The Submarine Strikes”

THE STORY: The legend of
Aquaman begins here -
story in November
1941’s 'More Fun Comics
73 (written by Mort
Weisinger with art by Paul
Norris)as the future king
of the sea takes on Nazi
submarines during World
War Il! In this story, our
hero isn’t given a name
other than Aquaman, and
the first version of his origin
story is less refıned than
what would come later.

Despite all this, Aquaman’s
inaugural adventure sets
him up as the champion we
know today. After all, who
could think of a better first
outing than throwing active
grenades at Nazis?

Weisinger introduces
Aquaman with a sense of
fun, swashbuckling action,
while Norris’s pulp style
illustrations establish Aquaman’s iconic look.

FOR FANS OF: Old school
pulp heroes, submarine
warfare, and Golden Age
fun.

WHAT’S NEXT: Aquaman’'s
Golden Age adventures
continue in ‘More Fun
Comics’ #74-78.

WHERE TO FIND IT: More
Fun Comics’ 73

BONUS: The 2008 animated
film Justice League: The
New Frontier’ features a
version of Aquaman heavily
influenced by his earliest
Comic appearances
.
“The Doom from Dimension Aqua”

THE STORY: If Aquaman’s
Golden Age adventures
were modeled after classic
pulp stories, then his Silver
Age run can be compared to
high-quality Saturday
morning cartoons. This
1963 issue not only
features the first
appearance of Atlantis’s
future queen Mera, but it
also stars Quisp, Aquaman’s
impish sidekick. Quisp was a
fun and forgotten addition
from this era of Aquaman,
whose overeager and
youthful nature made
Aqualad seem stoic in
comparison. Aquaman’s
Mera performs well in her
fiırst outing, impressing her
male counterparts with her
hard water powers. This
issue also alludes to the
world of Xebel (named
Dimenson Aqua here) and
other concepts that becamne
important in Aquaman’s
larger mythology. Writer
Jack Miller crafts a fun
Silver Age adventure story
perfectly complimented by
artist Nick Cardy’s
fantastical illustrations.

FOR FANS OF: Mythical
creatures, Silver Age
storytelling, old school
heroics and lovers of Mera
.
WHAT’S NEXT: Mera and
Aquaman finally get
together in Aquaman’ #18.

WHERE TO FIND IT:
Aauaman’ #11

BONUS: Mera appears in
the’Justice League’ episode
"The Terror Beyond, in
which she wears a costume
similar to that of herfirst
ComiC appearance.

“The Search for Mera”

THE STORY: When Mera
disappears, Aquaman
embarks on an odyssey that
takes him from sea to land
to find his missing queen. As
Aquaman searches for his
wife, the kingdom of
Atlantis is left exposed to
greedy politicians and
opportunistic enemies.
Writer Steve Skeates and
artist Jim Aparo team up for
a story arc that would
be Aquaman’s quintessential Bronze Age adventure.
add a sense of realism and
drama to Aquaman’s
fantastical world as Arthur
takes on streel-level foes on
the surface, while political
turmoil plagues his kingdom
beneath the sea.

FOR FANS OF: 'The
Odyssey, Bronze Age
drama, stunning art, and
adventure serials.

WHAT’S NEXT For more
Bronze Age-era Aquaman,
check out Adventure
Comics’ #444 and #448.

WHERE TO FIND IT:
‘Aquaman’ (1962) #40-48

“Time and Tide”

THE STORY: Before writer
Peter David began his
character-redefıning '9Os
run on Aquaman,
he explored Arthur’s past in
this limited series. Aquaman
learns his real name is Orin
and investigates a series of
journals that shed some
light on his family history.
Along the way, he flashes
back to his childhood being
raised by dolphins, his
earliest encounter with
mankind, his fırst team-up
with the Flash. and the
history of his conflict with
the Ocean Master. This
limited series is a fun primer
on the character that tells
readers everything they
need to know about
Aquaman and sets the stage
for the next era of his heroic
adventures,

FOR FANS OF: The Flash.
origin stories, Tarzan, and
Peter David.

WHAT’S NEXT Arthur and
the Ocean Master have an
epic rematch in Aquaman’
#18-20,

WHERE TO FIND IT:
Aquaman: Time and Tide’
#1-4

BONUS: For another fun
take onAquaman’s origin,
checkout the 2006 unaired
Aquaman’ TV pilot.

Hitting Bottom"

THE STORY: Comics
superstar writer Peter
David kicks off a new
Aquaman title by taking the
character in a daring new
direction. As the series
begins, Aquaman is having
something of a mid-life crisis
as he no longer has a queen,
a kingdom, or any real sense
of purpose. In his depression
he’s grown a beard, which
would become a staple of
the character. His former
partner Aqualad attempts to
bring Arthur out of his funk,
and the duo soon wind up
confronting the villainous
Charybdis. David quickly
shows readers he plays for
keeps as Charybdis feeds
Aquaman’s hand to a group
of hungry piranha. This
1994 storyline raised
Aquaman’s status in comic
fandom, as readers began to
see the stoic sea king evolve
into an action-adventure
badass. In fact, a big portion
of Jason Momoa’s live-
action portrayal of the
character comes from the
attitude displayed in this
run.

FOR FANS OF: Jason
Momoa’a Aquaman, 1990s
comics, body horror, and
action heroes.

WHAT’S NEXT: Peter
David’s groundbreaking run
on Aquaman continues in
Aquaman’ #9-48.

WHERE TO FIND IT:
Aquaman’ #1-8

BONUS:Check out the
Justice League’ episode
The Enemy Below to see
the animated version of
Arthur lose his hand.

“The Trench”

THE STORY: Arthur and
Mera try to leave their
stressful Atlantean life
behind by settling down in a
coastal lighthouse. Their
picturesque sabbatical is
interrupted when a group of
sea creatures begin
abducting unsuspecting
humans. Aquaman and Mera
dive to the deepest, most
dangerous depths of the sea
to rescue the locals before
they become snacks for the
hungry Trench. Writer Geoff
Johns teams up with artist
extraordinaire lyan Reis for
a cinematic-style tale that
launches Aquaman into the
New 52. This story
establishes Aquaman’s place
in the current DC Universe
and dispels a few lingering
myths. Note: do NOT ask
Aquaman if he can chat with
sea bass

FOR FANS OF: The 2018
Aquaman’ film, swashbuckling warriors, and horror flicks

WHAT’S NEXT: Check out
'Aquaman and the Others, a
team book from this era
starring Aquaman and a
group of seaside heroes.

WHERE TO FIND IT:
Aquaman’ (2011) #1-4

“Throne of Atlantis”

THE STORY: The Ocean
Master declares war on the
surface world, unleashing
the full might of the
Atlantean army on
humanity. The Justice
League do their best to keep
the armies at bay, as
Aquaman finds himself torn
between his teammates and
his brother. Aquaman tries
to find a peaceful way to end
the conflict. but is Orm too
bloodthirsty to care? Will
Aquaman be forced to
betray one of his worlds to
save the other? This
crossover event brings the
greater DC Universe into
Aquaman’s world for a story
that feels like a big-budget
cinematjc blockbuster. In
fact, the 2018 Aquaman’
film was partially inspired by
the events of this Earth
shattering story.

FOR FANS OF: The 2018
Aquaman’ film, 'Game of
Thrones, royal Intrigue,
superhero team-ups, and
hero vs. hero battles.

WHATS NEXT: Check out
the current fate of Atlantis
in 2016’s Rebirth ‘Aquaman’.

WHERE TO FIND IT:
Aquaman’ 14-17 and
Justice League’ # 15-17

BONUS: This storyline was
the basis for the 2015 epic
animated epic Justice
League: Throne of Atlantis

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Where to Start Reading Wonder
Woman Comics
Joshua Lapin-Bertone
Monday April 29

Suffering Sappho! The Invisible
Jet has just delivered tens of
thousands of digital comics to
the DC Universe library! And
where better to start your
reading adventure then with the
world’s first female
superhero? Whether you
first discovered Wonder
Woman when Lynda Carter
played the Amazon
Princess in the 1970s Wonder
Woman TV show, or when you
thrilled to Gal Gadot’s
adventures in the recent
blockbuster movie. there’s a
comic here for you. So grab your
Golden Lasso, while we suggest
the best place to start reading
Wonder Woman.

Gods and Mortals

THE STORY: After the reality-
altering events of 1985’s Crisis
on Infnite Earths, writer-artist
George Perez reimagined
Wonder Woman for the next
age of comics. In addition to
revamping the character, Perez
expanded upon the mythology
of Themyscira in a way no
creator had done before. In
Perez’s fırst story arc, readers
can witness the birth of Diana
and accompany her on her
journey to Man’s World as she
battles Ares. Perez’s rich reboot
introduced many of the
character’s definitive elements,
and has remained one of her
most iconic interpretations.

FOR FANS OF: The Gal Gadot
Wonder Woman movie took its
cues from this tale, which will
also appear to students of
Greek mythology and Perez’s
work on New Teen Titans and
Crisis on Infinite Earths,

WHAT’S NEXT: Read the
Legends limited series to see
Diana’s first Post-Crisis
encounters with the heroes of
the DCUniverse. and the rest of
Perez’s long run on the 1987
Wonder Woman title.

WHERE TO IND IT: Wonder
Woman (1987) #1-7

BONUS: Watch the acclaimed
2009 WonderWoman animated
movie, which adapts this
storyline.

Golden Age Wonder Woman

THE STORY: Read the tales that
started the legend! See the fırst
appearance of Diana, Steve
Trevor, the Invisible Plane.
Paradise lsland. and more! Some of Wonder Woman
creator William Moulton
Marston’s stories might be a
little dated by today’s
standards, but they were
written not all that long after
women received the right to
vote, and, in addition to being a
fascinating look at the World
War Il era, they’re full of the
female empowerment that
helped build Wonder Woman
into the icon she is today.

FOR FANS OF: Light-hearted
comics, Golden Age adventures,
World War ll action and
espionage films,

WHAT’S NEXT: Read Wonder
Woman #98 and beyond to see
how Diana transitioned from
the Golden Age to the wacky
fun of the Silver Age.

WHERE TO FIND IT: AI-Star
Comics #8, Sensation Comics
#1-48 and Wonder Woman
(1943)#1-15

BONUS: If you want more of
Diana’s adventures from the
1940s, check out the first
season of Lynda Carter’s
Wonder Woman TV series
which also places the heroine in
World War Il.

Who ls Wonder Woman?

THE STORY: After the events of
the 2005 event Infinite Crisis.
Wonder Woman is missing-
and her sister Donna Troy has
stepped in to fill her shoes.
Where is Diana? She’s taken on
a secret identity (Diana Prince)
so she can learn more about the
people she protects. This new
version of Diana Prince has a job
as a government agent, but
when Donna is kidnapped, she
must resume the mantle of
Wonder Woman once more.
Writer Allan Heinberg creates a
whole new world for Diana in a
story that set the character on a
bold new direction. The thrilling
story is enhanced by the iconic
illustrations from Terry and
Rachel Dodson, creating a
classic Wonder Woman story
for the ages.

FOR FANS OF: Spy and action
thrillers, as well as those who
enjoyed seasons 2 and 3 of the
Wonder Woman TV Series, in
which Diana Prince was a
government agent in the 1970s.
And if you loved the 2017
Wonder Woman movie, you’ll
be thrilled to learn that the
flm’s screenwriter Allan
Heinberg wrote this story.

WHAT’S NEXT: For the next
chapter in Diana’s life, check out
the 2007 limited series
Amazons Attack.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Wonder
Woman (2006) #1-4 and
Wonder Woman Annual (2017)
#1

Year One

THE STORY: Acclaimed writer
Greg Rucka and equally
acclaimed penciler Nicola Scott
take readers back to the
beginning, as the Amazons must
choose a champion to face the
mad god Ares! Diana is more
than ready for the challenge in a
story that chronicles her first
year as protector of Man’s
World. Rucka and Scott team up
for a cinematic contemporary take on Wonder Woman’s origin that works as a thrilling adventure story.

FOR FANS OF: This is a great
read for those who enjoyed
Greg Rucka’s outstanding
character-driven work on
Batwoman Gotham Central and
52 Fans of the 2017 Wonder
Woman movie will also find
themselves glued to this story.

WHAT’S NEXT:Check out
Wonder Woman: The Lies in
which Rucka’s take on Diana’s
present day adventures
continues

WHERE TO FIND IT: Wonder
Woman (2016) #2, #4, #6,#8,
#10.#12 and#14

BONUS: For a contemporary screen version on Diana’s early adventures in Man’s World. check out the 2009 animated Wonder Woman movIe!

The Diana Prince Era

THE STORY: In 1968, DC
Comics tried a new, experimental take on Wonder
Woman. Diana lost her powers
and her classic costume, and her Amazon sisters were
transported to another
dimension. As if things couldn’t
get any worse, her heart was
shattered when Steve Trevor
was murdered. Nevertheless,
Wonder Woman persisted. She
traded her costume for a stylish
Mod jumpsuit (not unlike that
worn by Emma Peel in the
1960s spy TV series The
Avengers), opened her own
clothing boutique, and became a
martial arts expert under her
new mentor, I Ching.

Diana embarked on a series of
adventures that took the
character well out of her
comfort zone, in a daring run of
comics written by the legendary
Denny O’Neil.

FOR FANS OF: Spy thrillers, the
swingin’'60s, and Denny O’Neil’s Batman and Green
Lantern/Green Arrow work.

WHAT’S NEXT: Check out
Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane
93 to see how Superman and
Lois react to the"new" Wonder
Woman

WHERE TO FIND IT: Wonder
Woman (1942) #178-203

BONUS: The groovy Wonder
Woman DC Nation Shorts
present a fun take on the character that invites comparisons to this era.

Paradise Island Lost

THE STORY: A civil war has
broken out on Paradise Island,
with Wonder Woman and her
mother Queen Hippolyta caught
in the middle! This two-part
story sets Diana on a new path,
and she steps down as Princess
of Themyscira in the story’s
conclusion. The tale has pulse-
pounding action as sister fights
against sister, and
heartbreaking drama as Diana’s
relationship with her mother is
put under a heavy strain.
George Perez, who reimagined
Wonder Woman

In 1987’s"Gods and Mortals"
story, teams up with his
protege, artist Phil Jimenez, for
a war that almost destroys the
Amazons forever.

FOR FANS OF: Those who love
TV epics like Game of Thrones
will appreciate the politics, civil
war, and family feuds, while fans
of artist George Perez’s run on
the character will be pleased to
see him back.

WHAT’S NEXT: Check out
Wonder Woman (1987)#177 to
see Diana fınally make peace
with her mother.

WHERE TO IND IT: Wonder
Woman (1987)#168-169

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Where to Start Reading Superman Comics
Joshua Lapin-Bertone
Tuesday April 23

Look,up in the sky! It’s a bird
It’s a plane! No, it’s a
humongous collection of
Superman comic books! Now
that DC Universe has expanded
its digital library to over 20,000
comics, there are enough
Superman issues to fill the
Fortress of Solitude. If you’ve
always thought about reading
the Man of Steel’s adventures.
but have never known where to
start, we’ve got you covered. Here are some recommendations to get you
started on your journey with the
Last Son of Krypton.

The Man of Steel

THE STORY: In 1986.writer
arist John Byrne (of X-Men and
Fantastic Four fame) left Marvel
for DC and wrote and
illustrated a brand-new take on
Superman’s origin. Learn about
Clark Kent. his friends and his
enemies in the limited series
that reshaped Superman for the
Moden Age of comics.

Byrne also developed the evil
businessman persona of Lex
Luthor (conceived by
Adventures of Superman writer
Marv Wolfman), which has
become the character’s standard
interpretation, and reintroduced Jonathan and Martha Kent as living, vital presences in their son’s life. In the span of six issues, readers are given a crash course in Superman’s world as Byrne (ably assisted by inker Dick Giordano) sets up a new
continuity that would defıne the
character for the next two
decades, including the
generation-defining “Death of
Superman” storyline.

FOR FANS OF: If you’re a fan of
the Christopher Reeve-starring
Superman movies, you’ll be
pleased to know that John
Byrne was too! Byrne took the
best elements from the Reeve
films (including Margot Kidder’s
sharp-tongued Lois Lane
in building a new mythology for
the Man of Steel

WHAT’S NEXT: lf you enjooy
John Byrne’s take on Superman
in this limited series, then check
out his run on the monthly Superman(1987) title that follovwed it. as well as
the concurrent Action Comics
(also written and illustrated by
Byrne) and Adventures of
Superman (written by Marv
Wolfman and illustrated by
Jerry Ordway).

WHERE TO FIND IT The Man of
Steel # 1-6

BONUS: TV’s Lois and Clark:
The New Adventures of
Superman ran from 1993 to
1997. Many aspects of this series, such as Clark Kent’s
persona, his parents designing
his suit and living to see him
marry Lois, and Lex Luthor’s
businessman characterization,
were inspired by the Man of
Steellimited series.

1996’s Superman: The Animated Series also took a number of its cues from Byrne.

All-Star Superman

FOR FANS OF: lf you loved the
2009 Batman & Robin series
then you’re in luck, because the
creative team of Morrison and
Quitely are behind this
masterpiece as well. Grant
Morrison’s offbeat Doom Patrol
comic inspired many of the
stories and characters in DC
Unjverse’s ljve-action Doom
Patrol series. So if you can’t get
enough of that, then you’re
going to love this

WHAT’S NEXT: lf you like writer
Grant Morrison’s take on the
Man of Steel. then check out his
run on Action Comic volume 2
(#1-18) in which he revamped
Superman for DC’s New 52
relaunch. and his celebrated run
on JLA which partners Supeman with DC’s other A-list champions,
including Batman and Wonder
Woman

WHERE TO FIND IT All-Star
Superman #1-12

BONUS: After you finish
reading the comic, check out
2011’s All-Star Superman
animated adaptation featuring
the voice of James Denton as
Superman.

Superman: Birthright

THE STORY: How did Clark
Kent go from farmboy to hero?
Award-winning writer Mark
Waid and artist Leinil F. Yu
present a fresh take on the Man
of Steel’s origin, as Clark Kent struggles to find his place
in the world while dealing with
his enemy Lex Luthor.

In Superman: Birthright writer
Mark Waid took the best pieces
from John Byrne’s 1986’s Man
of Steel limited series. and
added elements from his
encyclopedic knowledge ofthe
Silver Age while giving the
legend new relevence for the
21st century.

FOR FANS OF: If you love the
2013 Man of Steel flm. this is
the Superman origin for you.
Henry Cavill’s portrayal of
Superman’s beginnings,
including the line about S
standing for “hope” took some
of its cues from this series.

WHAT’S NEXT: If you love how
Mark Waid writes the
beginnings of Superman’s
career. be sure to check out
Kingdom Come, his tale
(illustrated by Alex Ross) of an
older Superman coming out of
retirement to fight a new
generation of villains.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Superman:
Birthright #1-12.

“For the Man Who Has Everything”

THE STORY: Wonder Woman.
Batman. and Robin arrive at the
Fortress of Solitude to celebrate
Superman’s birthday, but find
the Man of Steel in a trance.

Superman’s enemy Mongul has
trapped the Last Son of Krypton
with an alien plant known as the
Black Mercy. While under its effects, Superman imagines a
life in which Krypton never
exploded and he’s happily
married with children.

The bright fantasy, however,
soon turns dark, and Superman’s
friends struggle to free him. The
final act of this story features
one of Superman’s most
impressive battles as he
goes after Mongul with white-
hot fury… Writer Alan Moore
and artist Dave Gibbons, the
duo behind Watchmen, team up
to tell a Superman story that captivates after more than
thirty years.

FOR FANS OF: This is a great
tale for fans of DC’s Trinity
and Justice League Unlimited, as well as all who love the work of acclaimed writer Alan Moore
.
WHAT’S NEXT: If you loved the
battle between Superman and
Mongul, read DC Comics
Presents #27 to see their first
brawl. And be sure to read
Moore’s unforgettable two-part
tale of Superman’s battle in
“Whatever Happened to the
Man of Tomorrow?” (in
Superman #423 and Action
Comics #583) as well as his
Superman-Swamp Thing team-
up in DC Comics Presents #85

WHERE TO FIND IT: Superman
Annual #11

BONUS: This comic was
brilliantly adapted in the Justice
League Unlimited episode"For
The Man Who Has Everything

Superman For All Seasons

THE STORY: Writer Jeph Loeb
and artist Tim Sale come
together to tell a Superman
story focusing on family, home,
and heroism. Set during the
early days of Superman’s career,
readers learn how Clark’s childhood in Smallville
defined the superhero he would
becone in this beautiful
coming-of-age tale.

FOR FANS OF: Fans of the liveaction Smallvilleseries will love this Norman Rockwell-esque look at Clark Kent’s early years.

If you’re a Batman fan who
enjoyed The Long Halloween or
Dark Victory, you’ll love seeing
the team of Jeph Loeb andTim
Sale reunite for an equally
gripping Superman story.

WHAT’S NEXT:

Superman/Batman #26 reunites
Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale fora
tale in which Clark reminisces
about a high school friend who
died of cancer. This emotional
story was written as a tribute to
Loeb’s late son Sam. Bring some
tissues, because you may find
yourself shedding a few tears…
Sale returns to Superman’s early
days once more in the
“Kryptonite” storyline featured
in the first five issues of
2007’s Superman: Confidential

WHERE TO FINDIT: Superman
For All Seasons #1-4

Superman #1

THE STORY: Experience how
the legend began. 1939’s Superman #1 reprints the Man of Steel’s first
appearance from June 1938’s Action Comics #1 along with issues #2 through 4 and new pages detailing his origins for the first time. See how writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster changed the
cultural landscape and defined a
genre of storytelling, as Superman meets Lois Lane and becomes a champion for the
oppressed.

FOR FANS OF: Pop culture history, Golden Age comics.and 1930s and '40s crime and adventure movies. As
well as all who fight for social
justice

WHAT’S NEXT: lf Superman’s
Golden Age persona appeals to
you, check out more of his
adventures in the early years of
Action Comics, Superman, and
World’s Finest comics

WHERE TO FIND IT: Superman
(1939) # 1

BONUS: Check out animation
producer Max Fleischer’s
Superman cartoons to see how
the Golden Age Superman was
first translated to the screen
Thecartoons are from the
1940’s, but they remain among
the most beautifully animated
films of all time. and mark the
first time that Superman flew
in any medium!

Superman: American Alien

THE STORY: This Elseworlds tale (one in a long-running series of “imaginary” stories feauturing DC’s heroes) focuses on a young
Clark Kent as he tries to make
his way in a world he wasnt
born on. When he’s too human
to be a Kryptonian, but too alien
to be a human., where does that
leave him? How does a confused alien teenager grow up to become Earth’s greatest hero?
Screenwriter Max Landis’s script earned him an Eisner Award nomination.

FOR FANS OF: This story will be
fun for fans of Landis TV shows
and movies, including the
superhero fable Chronicle. lt’s
also great for fans of alternative
Superman stories and
contemporary coming-of-age
tales.

WHAT’S NEXT: If you’re a fan of
DC Elseworlds stories.check
out Superman: Red Son.This limited series (written by Kick-Ass and Kingsman
creator Mark Millar) imagines a
timeline in which baby
Superman’s rocket landed in
Russia instead of Kansas.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Superman:
American Alien #1-7

BONUS: Max Landis is currently
developing a sequel titled
Superman: Agent of Batman.

"What’s So Funny About Truth. Justice & the American Way?

THE STORY: A new group of
super-powered vigilantes
known as the Elite have
captured America’s attention.
The group is led by Manchester
Black. who doesn’t share
Superman’s sense of morality.
Superman grows uncomfortable
with their violent methods and
questionable ethics, bracing the
group for a showdown. Can
Clark beat the Elite without
compromising his moral
compass? Has the world simply
outgrown Superman? Writer
Joe Kelly answers all these
questions in a comic that’s become of the best
arguments for the Man of Steel
ever written.

FOR FANS OF: This comic is
perfect for anyone who’s ever
questioned Superman’s
relevance. Have you ever
wished Superman was more like
Batman? Do you prefer violent
anti-heroes like Lobo?Then this
story might have you rethink
everything you thought you
knewabout the Last Son of
Krypton.

WHAT’S NEXT Want to see
what happens with ManchesterSt
Black next? See what happens
when he’s drafted into the
Suicide Squad in Adventures of
Superman #593.

WHERE TO FIND IT Action
Comics #775

BONUS: This issue was adapted
into the 2012 animated movie
Superman vs. The Elite, featuring George Newbern reprising his Justice League Unlimited role as the Man of Steel

Silver Age Superman

THE STORY. The 1950s and
'60s was the Silver Age of
comics, a time Superman ruled
the newsstands! His stories
blended science fiction.
adventure, comedy, and
sometimes romance into a
mythology that’s still with us. It
was an era that chronicled the
history of Krypton. That gave us
Red Kryptonite, Brainiac,
Superman’s mermaid love Lori
Lemaris, the Bottle City of
Kandor. That saw Lois Lane and
Jimmy Olsen receive their own
comic series. And that
introduced Supergirl and the
Legion of Super-Heroes-

  • Superman’s friends from the
    distant future.

FOR FANS OF: If you’re in the
mood for light, fun reading with
no continuity hassles, then
these are the stories for you. These stories are also great
for fans of the 1950s George
Reeves-starring Adventures of
Superman TVs series
.
WHAT’S NEXT: lf you love
Superboy with the Legion of
Super-Heroes, check out
their adventures together in
1973’s Legionof Super-Heroes, as well as the animated
Legion of Super Heroes TV
series.

WHERE TO FIND IT Here are
fve stand-outs from that time:
Superman’s first meeting with
Batman in Superman #76,the
first appearance of
Superman’s cousin Supergirl
in Actions Comics #252, a
typically crazy scheme from
Jimmy Olsen in Action Comics
#340, the first appearance of
the Legion of Super-Heroes
in Adventure Comics #247 and
the first appearance of the Parasite in Superman #123.

BONUS: If you find Silver Age
Superman fun, then you’ll love
the Batman: Brave and the Bold
episode The Battle of the
Superheroes!" in which
Superman recreates some of the
most outrageous covers from
this era of comics.

Superman Secret Origins

THE STORY: After the reality-
altering events of 2005’s Infinite
Crisis, writer Geoff Johns and
artist Gary Frank teamed up to
give Superman a new origin
in this six-issue limited series.
Classicelements from the Silver
Age like Krypton’s culture and
Clark’s tenure as Superboy made their return. See Superman’s life story from his babyhood on Krypton to his teenage years in Smallville to his life in Metropolis as a Daily Planet reporter.

FOR FANS OF: This limited
series has the visuals of
Superman: The Movie, as well as
elements of the Silver Age
Superman, mixed in with the
best bits of John Byrne’s The
Man of Steel.

WHAT’S NEXT: If you love what
Geoff Johns and Gary Frank did
with Superman’s origin here,
check out how they handle a
modern version of the Man of
Steel in Action Comics #858-
863 and #866-870.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Superman:
Secret Origin #1-6

Superman: Secret ldentity
kurt busiek stuart immonen

THE STORY: Imagine what it
would be like growing up with
the same name as a famous
fictional character. Poor Clark
Kent finds himself the butt of
every Superman joke in this
Elseworlds tale. in which superheroes only exist in
comics. Soon, however, young
Clark finds he has the powers of
his fictjional namesake and
wants to use those abilities for
good. Writer Kurt Busiek tells
an inspiring tale exquisitely brought to life by Stuart Immonen’s photorealistic
art.

FOR FANS OF: Those who love
TV’s Smallville and the unique
flavor of superhero neorealism
found in Busiek’s Marvels and
Astro City will love following
Clark on his heroic journey.

WHAT’S NEXT: There are lots
more Elseworlds Superman
stories to reacd. For more of Kurt Busiek’s Man of Steel stories.check out his run on the
monthly Superman book, which
ran from Superman #650 to
#675.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Superman:
Secret ldentity#1-4.

BONUS: This story was inspired
bythe tale of “Superboy Prime”
(the “real world” Superboy)
found in DC Comics Presents
#87.

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The Grant Morrison run of doom patrol. Just read it.

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For a beginner who wants to start somewhere, I would say begin with #1 of Justice League (new 52).

1 Like