DC History Club..September 2020 - Secret Origin: The Story of DC Comics, Expanded Weekly Polls, Discussion, Quiz

Sec Or

This month the DC History Club steps back from our usual deep-dives on books, creators, characters, movies and more to take a broader look on how all of these elements fit together to form the broader picture of the first 75 years of DC Comics. With the documentary Secret Origin: The Story of DC Comics as our primary source and guide we are going to travel from Action #1 through the first decade of the 21st Century. In addition to a watch along of the documentary, each week we will focus on a different era with expanded polls on everything from comics, characters, creators, executives and projects outside of comics. This is your chance to choose everything from essential readings to the best animated series of a generation. In addition, we’ll have topic discussion suggests, a research wiki and an expanded quiz.
Watch Along 2020-09-08T01:00:00Z That’s 8:00 PM Central, 9:00 PM Eastern, 6:00 PM Pacific

Secret Origin: The Story of DC Comics
https://www.dcuniverse.com/videos/secret-origin-the-story-of-dc-comics/37/video-specials

Schedule:
Watch Along: September 7th 10:00 PM Eastern, 7:00 PM Pacific
A new expand poll section each week
Week 1: Golden Age: polls, discussion, watch along
Week 2: Silver Age: polls, discussion
Week 3: Bronze Age: polls, discussion, quiz
Week 4: Modern Age: polls, discussion

Note on eras and polls: Individual characters, creators, executives and other topics for polling appear only once in a category placed in the era of either their debut or in the case of real persons their greatest impact. When voting consider their entire history. Placing them in a single era isn’t perfect, but DC’s history is so large we had to figure out some way of simplifying.

Suggested discussion topics for each week:

  1. What comics from this era do you consider an essential reading for a comics fan?
  2. If you could only recommend one comic from this era to hook someone on DC comics, which would it be?
  3. Which creators from this era do you think are the most historically significant, and which are just your favorites?
  4. What project outside of comics from this era are the most historically significant, and which are just your favorites?
  5. What did we miss? Who did we inexplicably snub?
4 Likes

Golden Age Reading and Polls
Essential Readings:
Action #1 (Superman debut story 1938)
Detective #27 (Batman debut story 1939)
Sensation Comics #1 (Wonder Woman debut 1942)
All-Star #4 (JSA team adventure debut 1940)

Polls:

  1. Which of these stories should be included in the DC History Club’s Golden Age Essential Readings, for its contributions to the history of DC Comics? (Vote for 3)
  • Superman #1 (expanded origin story 1939)
  • Detective Comics #38 (Robin debut story 1940)
  • All-American Comics #16 (Green Lantern debut story 1940)
  • Batman #1 (Joker, Catwoman debut stories 1940)
  • Flash #1 (Flash, Hawkman debut stories 1940)
  • More Fun Comics #55 (Dr. Fate debut story 1940)
  • More Fun Comics #73 (Green Arrow and Aquaman debut stories 1941)
  • World’s Finest Comics #71 (1st Superman/Batman team up 1941)
  • Detective #66 (Two-Face debut story 1942)
  • Detective #64 (Boy Commandos debut story 1942)
  • Star Spangled Comics #7 (Newsboy Legion debut story 1942)
  • Star Spangled Comics #65 (1st Robin solo comic 1946)
  • Flash Comics #86 (Black Canary debut 1947)
  • Detective #225 (Martian Manhunter debut 1955)

0 voters

  1. Other than Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman, what hero character or team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Atom
  • Black Canary
  • Dr. Fate
  • Dr. Mid-Nite
  • Flash
  • Green Lantern
  • Hawkman
  • Hourman
  • Johnny Quick
  • Justice Society of America
  • Liberty Belle
  • Martian Manhunter
  • Mister Terrific
  • Phantom Lady
  • Phantom Stranger
  • Plastic Man
  • Shazam (dba Captain Marvel)
  • Spectre
  • Wildcat

0 voters

  1. What teenaged hero character or team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Boy Commandos
  • Captain Marvel Jr.
  • Newsboy Legion
  • Mary Marvel
  • Robin
  • Speedy
  • Superboy

0 voters

  1. What villains or villain team introduced in this era are the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Black Adam
  • Cheetah
  • Dr. Psycho
  • Dr. Sivana
  • Gentleman Ghost
  • Giganta
  • Injustice Society
  • Lex Luthor
  • Mr. Mind
  • Mr. Mxyztplk
  • Prankster
  • Solomon Grundy
  • Toyman
  • The Fiddler
  • The Monocle
  • The Thorn
  • Ultra-Humanite
  • Vandal Savage

0 voters

  1. What Batman villains introduced in this era are the most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Catwoman
  • Clayface
  • Joker
  • Hugo Strange
  • Killer Moth
  • Mad Hatter
  • Penguin
  • Riddler
  • Scarecrow
  • Two-Face

0 voters

  1. What writer who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics? Consider their entire career when voting. (Vote for 3)
  • Jack Cole (Plastic Man)
  • Bill Finger (Batman, Robin, Joker, Catwoman)
  • Gardner Fox (Flash, Hawkman, Dr. Fate, All-Star Comics)
  • William Moulton Marston (aka Charles Moulton) (Wonder Woman)
  • Jerry Seigel (Superman, Superboy, Supergirl, Spectre, Star Spangled Kid)
  • Joe Simon (Boy Commandos, Newsboy Legion)
  • Mort Weisinger (Green Arrow, Aquaman, Johnny Quick)

0 voters

  1. What artist from this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Vote for 3)
  • Bob Kane (Batman, Robin, Joker, Catwoman, Green Lantern)
  • Jack Kirby (Boy Commandos, Newsboy Legion, Mr. Miracle, New Gods)
  • Joe Kubert (Hawkman, Sgt Rock)
  • Harry Lampart (Flash)
  • Martin Nodell (Green Lantern)
  • George Papp (Green Arrow)
  • H. G. Peter (Wonder Woman)
  • Jerry Schuster (Superman)

0 voters

  1. What DC editor or executive who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Vote for 2)
  • Harry Donenfeld (co-founder, co-owner of DC Comics, bought rights to Superman)
  • Whitney Ellsworth (editorial director for Batman, Superman books)
  • M.C. Gaines (devised forerunner to standard comic book format, co-publisher All-American line)
  • Jack Liebowitz (co-founder, co-owner of DC comics, launched Action Comics)
  • Sheldon Mayer (editor for All-American line of DC, Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, JSA, Wonder Woman)
  • Major Malcom Wheeler-Nicholson (founder National Allied Publications, co- founder DC Comics)

0 voters

  1. What non-comic book project from this era that includes a DC character was most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Superman (daily newspaper comic strip 1939-66)
  • The Adventures of Superman (radio program 1940-51)
  • Adventures of Captain Marvel (movie serial 1941)
  • Superman animated shorts (Max Fleischer cartoons 1941
  • Spy Smasher (movie serial 1942)
  • Batman (movie serial 1943)
  • Batman and Robin (daily newspaper comic strip 1943-1991)
  • Wonder Woman (daily newspaper comic strip 1944-45)
  • Hop Harrigan America’s Ace of the Airwaves (movie serial 1946)
  • The Vigilante (movie serial 1947)
  • Superman (movie serial 1948)
  • Congo Bill (movie serial 1948)
  • Batman and Robin (movie serial 1949)
  • Atom Man vs. Superman (movie serial 1950)
  • Superman and the Mole Men (movie starring George Reeves, 1951)
  • Blackhawk: Fearless Champion of Freedom (movie serial 1952)
  • Adventures of Superman (television show starring George Reeves 1952-58)

0 voters

3 Likes

Silver Age Reading and Polls
Essential Readings:
Showcase #4 (Flash Barry Allen debut 1956)
The Brave and the Bold #28 (Justice League of America debut 1960)
The Flash #123 (Earth 2, multiverse debut 1961)
Justice League of America #21-22 (1st JLA/JSA crossover 1963)
Doom Patrol #121 (death of the Doom Patrol 1968)

  1. Which of these stories should be included in the DC History Club’s Silver Age Essential Readings, for its contributions to the history of DC Comics? (Vote for 3)
  • Adventure Comics #247 (Legion of Superheroes debut 1958)
  • Superboy #68 (Bizarro debut 1958)
  • Action Comics #242 (Brainiac/Kandor debut 1959)
  • Action #252 (Supergirl debut 1959)
  • Showcase #22 (Green Lantern debut 1959)
  • Brave and the Bold #34 (Hawkman Katar Hol and Hawkgirl Sheyera Hol debut 1961)
  • Adventure Comics #304 (death of Lightning Lad 1963)
  • Detective #327 (updated Batman with yellow ellipse 1964)
  • Brave and the Bold #54 (Teen Titans debut 1964)
  • Justice League of America #29 (Earth 3, Crime Syndicate of America debut 1964)
  • Brave and the Bold #60 (Wonder Girl debut 1965)
  • Detective #359 (Batgirl, Barbara Gordon debut 1967)
  • Aquaman #35 (Black Manta debut 1967)
  • Wonder Woman #178 (Mod, depowered Wonder Woman 1968)

0 voters

  1. What hero character or team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 4)
  • Adam Strange
  • Animal Man
  • Atom (Ray Palmer)
  • Captain Atom
  • Creeper
  • Deadman
  • Doom Patrol
  • Elongated Man
  • Flash (Barry Allen)
  • Green Lantern (Hal Jordan)
  • Greem Lantern (Guy Gardner)
  • Hawkgirl (Shayera Hol)
  • Hawkman (Katar Hol)
  • Legion of Superheroes
  • Mera
  • Metal Men
  • Metamorpho
  • Question
  • Red Tornado
  • Zatanna

0 voters

  1. What teenaged hero character introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Bargirl (Barbara Gordon)
  • Batgirl (Betty Kane)
  • Beast Boy
  • Dove
  • Cosmic Boy
  • Hawk
  • Kid Flash
  • Lightning Lad
  • Saturn Girl
  • Supergirl
  • Wonder Girl

0 voters

  1. What villains or villain team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 4)
  • Amazo
  • Bizzaro
  • Black Hand
  • Black Manta
  • Brainiac
  • Crime Syndicate of America
  • Despero
  • Dr. Light
  • Eclipso
  • Felix Faust
  • Killer Croc
  • Mr. Freeze
  • Ocean Master
  • Owlman (CSA)
  • Parasite
  • Poison Ivy
  • Sinestro
  • Star Sapphire
  • Starro
  • Ultraman

0 voters

  1. What Flash villains introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Abra Kadabra
  • Captain Boomerang
  • Captain Cold
  • Dr. Alchemy
  • Gorilla Grodd
  • Heat Wave
  • Mirror Master
  • Reverse Flash
  • Pied Piper
  • Trickster
  • Weather Wizard

0 voters

  1. What writers who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics? Consider their entire career when voting. (Vote for 2)
  • Cary Bates (Flash, Legion of Superheroes, Superboy)
  • Otto Binder (Superboy, Jimmy Olsen, Legion of Super-Heroes, Krypto)
  • John Broome (Flash, Green Lantern, Detective Chimp, Elongated Man, Batman)
  • Arnold Drake (Doom Patrol, Deadman)
  • Bob Haney (Sgt. Rock, Aquaman, Doom Patrol, Teen Titans)
  • Robert Khanigher (Flash, Sgt Rock, Enemy Ace, Wonder Woman)
  • Jim Shooter (Legion of Superheroes, Superman, Superboy, Supergirl)

0 voters

  1. What artists from this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Voter for 2)
  • Ross Andru (Wonder Woman, Flash)
  • Wayne Boring (Superman)
  • Nick Cardy (Aquaman, Teen Titans)
  • Carmen Infantino (Flash, Batman, Elongated Man, Batgirl)
  • Gil Kane (Green Lantern, Atom, Teen Titans)
  • Sheldon Moldoff (Kane ghost artist Batman, Batwoman, Poison Ivy)
  • Al Plastino (Superboy, Lois Lane, Legion of Superheroes)
  • Mike Sekowsky (JLA, Supergirl)
  • Curt Swan (Superman)

0 voters

  1. What DC editor or executive who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Vote for 2)
  • Irwin Donenfeld (Executive Vice President, revived Batman, ensured at least one cover had a gorilla each month, decided to preserve film negatives of comics produced)
  • Carmine Infantino (Publisher rejuvenated Wonder Woman, added reprints for extra pages, Editorial Director hired Adams, Kubert, Orlando, Giordano; )
  • Joe Orlando (editor House of Mystery, Vice President DC merchandising)
  • Julius Schwartz (editor Flash, Green Lantern, Superman, Batman)
  • Jack Schiff (editor Batman line)
  • Mort Weisinger (editor Superman line)

0 voters

  1. What non-comic book project from this era that includes a DC character was most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Batman (live action television show 1966)
  • Batman: The Movie (film based on television show 1966)
  • It’s a Bird… It’s a Plane… It’s Superman (Broadway musical 1966)
  • The New Adventures of Superman (animated 1966-70)
  • The Adventures of Superboy (animated 1966-69)
  • The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure (animated 1967-68)
  • Aquaman (animated 1968-70)
  • The Batman/Superman Hour, The Adventures of Batman (animated 1968-69)

0 voters

4 Likes

Bronze Age Reading and Polls
Essential Readings:
Green Lantern/Green Arrow #76 (start of hard-charging heroes 1970)
Batman #232 (Ra’s al Ghul debut 1971)
Batman #251 (Joker rejuvenated 1973)
The Saga of the Swamp Thing #21 (The Anatomy Lesson Moore’s Swamp Thing origin 1984)
Tales of the Teen Titans #42 (The Judas Contract 1984)
Crisis on Infinite Earths #1 (1985)
Superman Annual #11 (For the Man who has Everything 1985)

  1. Which of these stories should be included in the DC History Club’s Bronze Age Essential Readings, for its contributions to the history of DC Comics? (Vote for 3).
  • Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #134 (Darkseid debut 1970)
  • Detective #411 (Talia al Ghul debut 1971)
  • House of Secrets #92 (Swamp Thing debut 1971)
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #85-86 (Speedy’s addiction story 1971)
  • Mr. Miracle #1 (Mr. Miracle debut 1971)
  • New Gods #1 (1971)
  • All Star Western #10 (Jonah Hex debut 1972)
  • Adventure Comics #431 (Spectre returns with a vengeance 1974)
  • Black Lightning #1 (1977)
  • Detective Comics #471 (Hugo Strange return by Englehart and Rogers 1977)
  • Superman vs. Muhammad Ali (1978)
  • Detective #457 (Joker Laughing Fish 1978)
  • Flash #275 (Death of Iris Allen 1979)
  • The New Teen Titans #1 (1980)
  • All-Star Squadron #1 (1981)
  • Camelot 3000 #1 (1982)
  • Legion of Super-Heroes #290 (The Great Darkness Saga 1982)
  • Batman and the Outsiders #1 (1983)

0 voters

  1. What hero character or team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Big Barda
  • Black Lightning
  • Black Orchid
  • Demon Etrigan
  • Fire
  • Geoforce
  • Green Lantern (John Stewart)
  • Huntress
  • Infinity Inc.
  • John Constantine
  • Jason Todd
  • Jonah Hex
  • Katana
  • Mr. Miracle
  • Omega Men
  • Swamp thing
  • The Outsiders
  • Vibe
  • Vixen
  • Warlord (Travis Morgan)

0 voters

  1. What teenaged hero character introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Cyborg
  • Firestorm
  • Halo
  • Jade
  • Kamandi
  • Mal Duncan
  • Obsidian
  • Raven
  • Starfire

0 voters

  1. What villains or villain team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Anti-Monitor
  • Blackfire
  • Brother Blood
  • Chesire
  • Count Vertigo
  • Darkseid
  • Deadshot
  • Deathstroke
  • Granny Goodness
  • Killer Frost
  • Lady Shiva
  • Lobo
  • Man-Bat
  • Merlyn
  • Mongul
  • Ra’s al Ghul
  • Phobia
  • Talia al Ghul
  • Terra
  • Trigon

0 voters

  1. What writers who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics? Consider their entire career when voting? (Vote for 2)
  • Cary Bates (Legion of Superheroes, Flash)
  • Gerry Conway (JSA, Wonder Woman)
  • Steve Englehart (JLA, Batman)
  • Mike Grell (Warlord, Green Lantern)
  • Jack Kirby (Jimmy Olsen, Mr. Miracle, New Gods, OMAC, The Losers)
  • Paul Levitz (Superboy, Legion of Superheroes, Justice Society)
  • Doug Moench (Batman)
  • Dennis O’Neil (Superman, Batman, Green Arrow, Green Lantern)
  • Len Wein (JLA, Swamp Thing, Phantom Stranger, Batman)
  • Marv Wolfman (Teen Titans, Crisis, Batman)

0 voters

  1. What artists from this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Voter for 2)
  • Neal Adams (Superman, Batman
  • Jim Aparo (Aquaman, Batman 7 Outsiders, Green Arrow)
  • Dick Dillin (JLA, Blackhawk, Green Lantern)
  • Gene Colan (Wonder Woman, Batman)
  • Steve Bissette (Swamp Thing)
  • Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez (Superman, Batman)
  • Keith Giffen (Legion of Superheroes, JLA, Lobo)
  • Mike Grell (Legion of Superheroes, Warlord, Green Lantern, Green Arrow)
  • Don Heck (Wonder Woman)
  • George Perez (Teen Titans, Crisis, JLA)
  • Marshall Rogers (Batman)
  • Curt Swan (Superman)
  • Bernie Wrightson (Swamp Thing)

0 voters

  1. What editor or executive who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Vote for 2)
  • Richard Donner (Director Superman: The Movie)
  • Dick Giordano Executive Editor (credited with good relations with talent, experimented with paper, format)
  • Jenette Kahn (Publisher, convinced Warner to keep publishing DC, promoted royalty payments)
  • Stanley Ralph Ross (Producer Wonder Woman tv)
  • Ilya and Alexander Sulkind (Producers Superman: The Movie)

0 voters

  1. What non-comic book project from this era that includes a DC character was most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Super Friends (animated 1973, 1978, 1980-83)
  • The New Adventures of Batman (animated show 1977)
  • The Plastic Man Comedy/Adventure Show (animated show 1979-81)
  • Shazam (live action television show 1974-76)
  • The Secrets of Isis (live action television show 1975-76)
  • Superman: The Movie (1978)
  • Superman II (1980)
  • Superman III (1983)
  • Supergirl (1984)
  • Wonder Woman (television 1975-79 show)
  • Legends of the Superheroes (Two television specials 1979)
  • It’s a Bird… It’s a Plane… It’s Superman (television special 1975)
  • Swamp Thing (movie 1982)

0 voters

4 Likes

Note: Polls are limited to 20 options, so a lot of great books, artists and writers did not make the cut. Tell us who we missed.

Modern Age Reading and Polls
Essential Readings:
Batman: The Dark Knight Returns #1 (1986)
Watchmen #1 (1986)
Man of Steel #1 (1986)
Batman #426-429 (A Death in the Family 1988)
Superman #75 (The Death of Superman 1992)
Kingdom Come #1 (1996)

Polls:

  1. Which of these stories should be included in the DC History Club’s Modern Age Essential Readings, for its contributions to the history of DC Comics? (Vote for 4).
  • Wonder Woman #1 (1986)
  • Batman #404 (Batman: Year One 1987)
  • Green Arrow: The Long Bow Hunters #1 (1987)
  • Batman: The Killing Joke (1988)
  • Animal Man #1 (1988)
  • The Sandman #1 (1989)
  • Doom Patrol #19 (Morrison run begins 1989)
  • Batman #442 (A Lonely Place of Dying, Tim Drake debut 1989)
  • Death: The High Cost of Living (1993)
  • Starman #1 (1994)
  • Aquaman #1 (start Peter David run, 1994)
  • Batman Adventures: Mad Love (Harley Origin, 1994)
  • JLA #1 (Morrison 1997)
  • Fables #1
  • Batman #608 (Hush 2002)
  • Gotham Central #1 (2003)
  • New Frontier #1 (2004)
  • Identity Crisis #1 (2004)
  • All Star Superman #1 (2006)
  • JSA #1 (2007)

0 voters

  1. What hero character or team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Animal Man
  • Artemis
  • Azreal
  • Batwing
  • Batwoman (Kate Kane)
  • Booster Gold
  • The Comedian
  • Dr. Manhattan
  • Icon
  • Manhunter (Kate Spencer)
  • Mister Terrific (Michael Holt)
  • Nite Owl
  • Oracle
  • Rocket Red
  • Rorschach
  • Silk Spectre
  • Steel
  • Suicide Squad (new version)

0 voters

  1. What teenaged hero character introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Batgirl (Cassandra Cain)
  • Batman (Batman Beyond Terry McGinnis)
  • Blue Beetle (Jaime Reyes)
  • Impulse (Bart Allen)
  • Miss Martian
  • Red Hood
  • Robin (Tim Drake)
  • Robin (Damian Wayne)
  • Rose Wilson
  • Stargirl
  • Static
  • Superboy (Conner Kent)
  • Supergirl (Linda Lee)
  • Wonder Girl (Cassie Sandsmark)

0 voters

  1. What villains or villain team introduced in this era is the most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Atrocitus
  • Bane
  • Court of Owls
  • Cyborg Superman
  • Doomsday
  • Harley Quinn
  • Hush
  • KGBeast
  • LarFleeze
  • Livewire
  • King Shark
  • Maxwell Lord
  • Parallax
  • Professor Pyg
  • Victor Zsasz
  • Ventriloquist

0 voters

  1. What writers who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics? Consider their entire career when voting? (Vote for 4)
  • Frank Miller (Dark Knight)
  • Alan Moore (Swamp Thing, Watchmen, Superman, V for Vendetta)
  • John Byrne (Superman, Wonder Woman, Doom Patrol)
  • John Ostrander (Suicide Squad, Spectre)
  • George Perez (Wonder Woman)
  • Grant Morrison (Animal Man, Doom Patrol, JLA)
  • Neil Gaiman (The Sandman)
  • Peter David (Aquaman, Supergirl
  • Dan Jurgens (Superman, Booster Gold)
  • Jerry Ordway (Superman, Shazam)
  • Darwyn Cooke (New Frontier, Catwoman)
  • Chuck Dixon (Robin, Birds of Prey, Batman)
  • Louise Simonson (Superman)
  • Mike W. Barr (Outsiders, Batman)
  • Bill Willingham (Fables, JSA, Shadowpact)
  • Mark Waid (Flash, Kingdom Come)
  • Jeph Loeb (Batman, Superman)
  • Geoff Johns (Flash, JSA, Teen Titans, Green Lantern)
  • Greg Rucka (Gotham Central, Wonder Woman, Batman)
  • Gail Simone (Birds of Prey, Secret Six, Batgirl, Superman)

0 voters

  1. What artists from this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Vote for 4)
  • Brian Bolland (Batman, Wonder Woman, Animal Man)
  • John Byrne (Superman, Wonder Woman, Doom Patrol)
  • Ian Churchill (Supergirl, Titans)
  • Darwyn Cooke (New Frontier, Catwoman)
  • Denys Cowan (Question, Batman)
  • Tony Daniel (Batman, Teen Titans)
  • Alan Davis (Batman, JLA, Outsiders)
  • Dave Gibbons (Superman, Watchmen, Green Lantern)
  • Gary Frank (Superman, Batman, Doomsday Clock)
  • Phil Jimenez (Batman, Wonder Woman)
  • Adam Kubert (Adam Strange, Superman)
  • Kevin Maguire(JLA, Titans, Batman)
  • Doug Mahnke (Black Adam, Superman, JLA)
  • Todd McFarlane (Batman, Infinity Inc)
  • Ed McGuinness (Superman, Batman, JLA)
  • Jim Lee (Batman, Superman, JLA)
  • Frank Miller (Dark Knight)
  • Alex Ross (Kingdom Come)
  • Tim Sale (Batman, Superman)
  • Frank Quitely (JLA, Superman, Batman)

0 voters

  1. What editor, executive or director who worked during this era had the greatest impact on the history of DC Comics during their entire career? (Vote for 2)
  • Karen Berger (Executive Editor Vertigo)
  • Tim Burton (director Batman, Batman Returns)
  • Alfred Gough and Miles Miller (Producers/writers Smallville)
  • Pault Levitz (editor, President DC Comics)
  • Christopher Nolan (Director Batman Begins, The Dark Knight)
  • Dennis O’Neil (editor Batman)
  • Joel Schumacher (Director Batman Forever, Batman and Robin)
  • Zach Snyder (director Watchmen)
  • Mike Uslan (Producer Batman)

0 voters

  1. What live action movie from this era that includes a DC character was most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987)
  • The Return of Swamp Thing (1989)
  • Batman (1989)
  • Batman Returns (1992)
  • Batman Forever (1995)
  • Batman and Robin (1997)
  • Steel (1997)
  • Catwoman (2004)
  • Batman Begins (2005)
  • Constantine (2005)
  • Superman Returns (2006)
  • The Dark Knight (2008)
  • Watchmen (2009)
  • Jonah Hex (2010)

0 voters

  1. What live action television show from this era that includes a DC character was most historically significant? (Vote for 2)
  • Superboy (1988-92)
  • Swamp Thing (1990-93)
  • The Flash (1990-91)
  • Human Target (1992)
  • Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1993-97)
  • Smallville (2001-11)
  • Birds of Prey (2002-03)

0 voters

  1. What animated television show or movie from this era that includes a DC character was most historically significant? (Vote for 3)
  • Superman (Ruby-Spears 1988)
  • Swamp Thing (1990-91)
  • Batman: The Animated Series (1992-95)
  • The Superman/Batman Adventures (1995-97)
  • Superman: The Animated Series (1996-2000)
  • The New Batman Adventures (1997-99)
  • The New Batman/Superman Adventures (1997-2000)
  • Batman Beyond (1999-2001)
  • Static Shock (2000-04)
  • Justice League (2001-04)
  • Teen Titans (2003-06)
  • Justice League Unlimited (2004-06)
  • The Batman (2004-08)
  • Krypto the Superdog (2005-06)
  • Legion of Super Heroes (2006-08)
  • Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2008-11)

0 voters

3 Likes

Quiz: How well do you know the Secret Origin of DC Comics? Test your knowledge in this expanded quiz with questions spanning the Ages.

  1. What business were Harry Donnefield and Harry Lebowitz in before acquiring National Allied Publications (DC Comics)?
  • Magazine publishers
  • Printers
  • Waste Disposal

0 voters

  1. What was the first comic published by National Allied Publications?
  • New Fun
  • Detective Comics
  • More Fun Comics

0 voters

  1. In the early 1940s, how much per week were Siegel and Schuster each paid to produce Superman comics?
  • $75
  • $125
  • $250
  • $800

0 voters

  1. What device did Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston claim to have invented?
  • Sphygmomanometer
  • Defibrillator
  • Lie Detector

0 voters

  1. What activity during World War II helped lead to a scarcity of Golden Age comics?
  • Rationing
  • Censorship
  • Paper drives

0 voters

  1. DC Comics success with the Justice League of America directly prompted the creation of what Marvel Comics team?
  • Avengers
  • Fantastic Four
  • X-Men

0 voters

  1. According to Secret Origins, one year after the Comics Code began comics sales dropped by how much?
  • 25%
  • 30%
  • 50%
  • 75%

0 voters

  1. Swamp Thing debuted in what comic series?
  • Swamp Thing
  • House of Mystery
  • House of Secrets
  • Weird War Tales

0 voters

  1. What editor was assigned the project of relaunching the Flash?
  • Julius Schwartz
  • Carmine Infantino
  • Mort Weisinger

0 voters

  1. What writer famously depowered Wonder Woman, took Batman back to his roots, and grounded the Green Lantern?
  • Marv Wolfman
  • Denny O’Neil
  • Len Wein

0 voters

  1. When was Superman: The Movie was released?
  • July, 1976
  • July, 1978
  • December, 1978
  • December, 1980

0 voters

  1. Christopher Reeve studied acting at what school?
  • Harvard
  • Yale
  • King’s College
  • Julliard

0 voters

  1. What 28-year-old publishing executive was named President of DC comics, officially renamed the company and instituted a royalty system for creators?
  • Paul Levitz
  • Julius Schwartz
  • Jeanette Kahn
  • Joe Orlando

0 voters

  1. Mike Grell left writing Conan the Barbarian at Marvel Comics to created what character for DC?
  • Tarzan
  • Swamp Thing
  • Warlord
  • Kamandi

0 voters

  1. What two networks did Lynda Carter’s Wonder Woman originally air on?
  • ABC/CBS
  • Mutual/CW
  • CBS/NBC
  • ABC/NBC

0 voters

  1. What editor hired Alan Moore to write Swamp Thing?
  • Karen Berger
  • Len Wein
  • Joe Orlando

0 voters

  1. Before Karen Berger became Executive Editor of the Vertigo impact, she was editor on what comic?
  • Justice League
  • Detective Comics
  • Swamp Thing

0 voters

  1. Which founding member of Milestone Comics was also the Editor-in-Chief?
  • Dwayne McDuffie
  • Denys Cowan
  • Michael Davis
  • Derek T. Dingle

0 voters

  1. The best-selling issue comic of all time when it was released, told what story?
  • Debut of the Justice League
  • The death of Jason Todd
  • Superman fighting Muhammed Ali
  • The death of Superman

0 voters

  1. The ABC television show the Adventures of Lois and Clark lead directly to what comic book event?
  • Death of Superman
  • Relaunch of Man of Steel
  • Blue suit Superman

0 voters

  1. What comic was created in reaction to the nihilistic violence of 1990s comics?
  • Kingdom Come
  • Lobo
  • Identity Crisis

0 voters

Bonus Question: MSGTV has proven using comic sales numbers that what often repeated myth that appears on Secret Origins is untrue?

  • Lois Lane’s comic was a sales flop
  • GI’s in WWII read comics
  • Batman was on the verge of cancellation before the television show.

0 voters

Score Card
1-5: You win the “Everyone Wins” participation certificate
6-10: You win the “You’re Showing Great Potential” trophy
11-15: You win the “You Know Your Stuff” ribbon
16-20: You win the “DC Comics is My Domain” blue sash

Answer Key:

  1. Printers
  2. New Fun
  3. $800
  4. Lie Detector
  5. Paper Drives
  6. Fantastic Four
  7. 75%
  8. House of Secrets
  9. Julius Schwartz
  10. Denny O’Neil
  11. December, 1978
  12. Julliard
  13. Jeanette Kahn
  14. Warlord
  15. ABC/CBS
  16. Len Wein
  17. Swamp Thing
  18. Dwayne McDuffie
  19. The Death of Superman
  20. The Death of Superman
  21. Kingdom Come or Lobo
    Bonus. Batman was on the verge of cancellation before the television show.
4 Likes

Research wiki: Check out the links below. If you’ve got some good sources for general history of the DC comics click on the pencil to the right and add.

http://cbldf.org/2019/03/unparalleled-editor-karen-berger-she-changed-comics/

http://paullevitz.com/jenette-kahn-interview/

4 Likes

Video Research Wiki: Check out these video research wikis. If you’ve got a video source for good general DC history click on the pencil to the right and add it.

Alternate link for
Secret Origins

Silver Age

How Justice League of America comic created Fantastic Four

Bronze Age

Jack.Kirby Career
Goes to DC

Modern Age

Grant Morrison

Batman

Alan Moore

Neil Gaiman

Death of Superman

Dwayne McDuffie

Gail Simone

Michael.Uslan

Owner of rights to
Batman
Seamp.Thing

Joker

4 Likes

@TurokSonOfStone1950 here

These are my prior topics
On DC History

if you want to learn how Superman Batman.and Wonder Woman were created

The next two are timelines

They are not comprehensive
But are by year

if you want to learn significant events in super hero genre history

Thi link list introductory arcs for most of the characters in the DC Universe, intended for New DC Readers. Or those looking for clear good stories in general

This is my
DC history Book list
That I own
All available on Kindle

You.can download
sample
Of each book
For free

To get
Table of Contents

Sample points
To first chalter

Go to beginning
To see
Table of Contrnts

Books

Superman

Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero
Larry Tye

Superman: The Unauthorized Biography
Glen Weldon

Batman

The Caped Crusade: Batman and the Rise of Nerd Culture
Glen Weldon

Wonder Woman

The Secret History of Wonder Woman
Jill Lepore

Dick Grayson

Dick Grayson, Boy Wonder: Scholars and Creators on 75 Years of Robin, Nightwing and Batman
Kristen L. Geaman

Bios

Forgotten All-Star: A Biography of Gardner Fox
Jennifer DeRoss

Kirby: King of Comics (Anniversary Edition)
Mark Evanier

The Boy Who Loved Batman: A Memoir
Michael E. Uslan

History

Comic Book History of Comics: Birth of a Medium
Fred Van Lente

Super-History: Comic Book Superheroes and American Society, 1938 to the Present
Jeffrey K. Johnson

Comic Books and the Cold War, 1946–1962: Essays on Graphic Treatment of Communism, the Code and Social Concerns
Rafiel York

The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America
David Hajdu

Supergods: What Masked Vigilantes, Miraculous Mutants, and a Sun God from Smallville Can Teach Us About Being Human
Grant Morrison

4 Likes

DC History Facts: What do you get when Superman meets Mad Magazine? This little gem starring Superduperman found by our @TurokSonOfStone1950 from Mad #4, 1954. For those of who grew up reading Mad, the completely irreverant screwball humor is very familiar. This parody pulls no punches on Clark, Superman, Captain Marvel and more. And, it gives us a Lois Lane that’s meaner, tougher and more alluring than the real deal. See the link below for the entire story.
mad 1
Mad 2

4 Likes

Used to have a reprint of this as a kid. Loved it!

3 Likes

Revisitimg the Golden Age

In general
The Batman and Superman titles
In the Goldrn Age
are quite readable

Wonder Woman is its own thing
With a rather specific view of the world
That was unique to Marston

Some issues of All Star
Are a chore to read

In the Bronze and Modern.Eras

There were titles
That used the Golden Era
In their stories

They include

The Golden.Age

https://www.dcuniverse.com/comics/series/-/aff6fde0-738b-434e-b912-4a15ac24ae00

All Star Squadon

https://www.dcuniverse.com/comics/series/-/21d8c37b-99df-4f2c-b64e-c3ed3490faba

Origin of JSA

https://www.dcuniverse.com/comics/book/-/7c6088b7-e90d-4e8e-977d-5a534b3ccf32

America vs Justice Society

https://www.dcuniverse.com/comics/book/-/51b9fb30-afec-42c5-8d6f-a180dd7d5fb1

All Star Squadron 67, the last isdue

https://www.dcuniverse.com/comics/book/-/d55a9ce5-4c5f-4da3-989b-618db75d1252

Is a retelling of All Star 4

1 Like

The great thing about Mad was you could read the movie and tv parodies over and over. Plus, the first time I “saw” a lot of movies when I was young was in Mad, Godfather I and II, Clockwork Orange, Space Odyssey all first in Mad before I actually watthem.

4 Likes

Know exactly what you mean. My parents would take us kids out to the newstand once a week or so. My Dad would get a Mad magazine and my brother and I would get DC comics. (yeah, this is in the late 70s/early 80s when they still had comics in newstands!)

3 Likes

Both Superman 1 and Batman 1 are great reads

Action 1 ends on a cliffhanger.

Superman 1 is a reprint of the earliest stories from.Action and we get a much better idea of the character.

And Batman 1!

It may be one of the best comics of all time

It contains the second appearance of Robim

And also

A two page origin story which is all that is needed

The first appearance of the Joker

The first.appearance of Catwoman

The last story where Batman kills someone, by hanging a Monster Man
From his plane

The return of the Joker

A summary about Batman.1
From
The Boy Who Loved Batman: A Memoir
Michael E. Uslan

Michael Uslans owns the TV and movie right to Batman and is usually listed as Executive Producer in these videos

1964 Convention Broadway Central Hotel. Mike Uslan, his friend Bobby and Mike’s parents, on a humid July day in downtown New York City.

The world’s first ever comic book convention, with nearly two hundred fans.

At the bar, 13 year old Uslan was introduced to uncredited Batman co creator Bill Finger by Otto Binder.

Flo Steinberg, the gal Friday of Marvel Comics’ Stan Lee, Maggie Thompson and her husband Don, Roy Thomas, Len Wein and Marv Wolfman attended.

Dr. Jerry Bails, a professor at Wayne State University in Michigan, co-founder of comic book fandom with Roy Thomas, presided over the comic book auction.

Action.Comics 1 went for $40.

Uslan wanted Batman 1 badly. He was aware that in addition to this being the first edition of Batman Comics, it also marked the first appearance of BOTH the Joker and the Catwoman.

He had $22.50 and begged for five dollars more from his dad. He then bid 27.50. It sold for $29.

Years later Uslan’s wjfe bought him a oopy, for thousands of Dollars.

And we get to read it in our library

When I was a kid
I never dreamed such
A thing was possible

I must have read
My giant size reprint of
Action 1
Many times

When.an issue of Flash, 137,
Summarized the last issue
Of All Star Comics 57
Featuring the JSA
How I wanted it

Now we all have that issue too.

It’s not a bad story.

Bht the Flash summary made it sound much more exciting than it was.

2 Likes

I had a giant size reprint of Action that I bought from our small town five and dime store that had a long marble counter and served shakes and cherry colas even into the 70s. You could actually buy a comic in a town of 1014 people back then, though I went to the big town of 20,000 to get most of my comics.

3 Likes

Golden Age Facts: Clearing out Great Aunt Gerta’s root cellar you find a steamer trunk covered in dust and cat hair. Inside, sandwiched between her WAC uniform and dress patterns are original, good quality Golden Age comics. What could they be worth? Check out the ten most valuable Golden Age Comics. And, by the way Gerta is still alive so those comics belong to her.

3 Likes

Golden Age Facts: A little background on some of the early DC execs from Paul Levitz 75 Years of DC comics.

Harry Donenfeld: This Romanian immigrant took over his brothers’ printing press in 1923. Along with partner Jack Liebowitz, he contracted with National Allied Publications to print and disto More Fun, Action, Detective and other comics. In 1938, he sued National for nonpayment and acquired control of the company now named Detective Comics.

MC Gaines: A former school teacher, Gaines repackaged comics-format giveaways for Eastern Color Press in 1933, showing a demand for the product. In 1939, he founded a new imprint with DC business manager Jack Liebowitz named All-American Comics. He was bought out in 1944 and founded EC comics the future home of horror and Mad.

4 Likes

Golden Age Fact

Although our library
Does not have his first appearance in

Detective Comics Vol 1 225

Reprint of Jonn.Jonzz
First appearnce is in
World Finest 175 page 19
In our library

https://www.dcuniverse.com/comics/book/-/8cbf572c-83ec-41a7-bde6-4fcb243ef19d

3 Likes

Nice Detective work there @TurokSonOfStone1950

2 Likes