Live Q&A with Mark Waid, writer of KINGDOM COME, THE FLASH, and So Much More! Wednesday, 5/27 @5pm PT/8pm ET

Freelance careers take weird turns sometimes! There’s no doubt that I love the DC Universe. That’s all I can say…for now.

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We talked about it quite a bit. Dwayne was an awesome guy. I am a science nerd, yes, and that background has taught me to be very analytical about dissecting stories done by great writers and finding out what makes them tick.

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Editor Brian Augustyn and I wanted to give Wally a sidekick with a twist–he’d be so much like Wally that they’d hate each other! But once we realized WE loved Impulse, he softened–and luckily, that ended up being the key that allowed him to have his own series!

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I’m afraid we’ve told that story, my friend. Sometimes it’s good to leave the audience wanting more. But I’m grateful for the kind words!

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Whoof. Tough one. A degree doesn’t automatically translate into a career in writing, sadly. Worry less about the exact curriculum and concentrate on learning what you’re passionate about. That’ll inform your work. For instance, I was a physics minor, and I still use what I’ve learned to inspire stories about superpowered characters. Feed your head all you can if you want to be a writer. Learn as much as you can about the world around you.

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I’m confident that DC’s current management is just as eager as I am to see Wally in his rightful place of prominence. Trust me.

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That’s a dream character. Anything can happen!

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Good question–I hear that sometimes. I read Twilight in 1988, 1989 or so when I was an editor at DC (and loved it). Alex, however, had never read it until we were well into the second or third issue of Kingdom Come, after it was all blocked. It’s possible that some small elements of Moore’s pitch influenced some of my own ideas–that’s what good writing is supposed to do–but I think we ultimately took the DCU in a more hopeful direction…?

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:clap: :clap: :clap:
@MarkWaid is on fire!!

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Hi, godolphin. For those who don’t know, we’re referring to a series I wrote for another publisher, IRREDEEMABLE, about what might happen with a superhero who turned into a ruthless supervillain. No, I actually hadn’t been carrying that idea around with me for long–it was inspired by an offhand comment from Grant Morrison. All good ideas come from Grant Morrison in one form or another.

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My favorite answer in any Q&A yet.

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You are very kind. And Miracle Monday wins that tie, but only by a nose. It’s sort of impossible, looking back, for me to not think of Elliot Maggin’s writing as a whole.

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Thanks for the info, and thanks for being here for this q&a.

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Thank you so much for answering my question Mr. Waid!
Loved your appearance on DC Daily and oh boy that phantom projector was cool!

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Thank you for answering my question! I’m happy he was able to get his own series because of that!

Thanks for being here!

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I met you years ago when I was younger at Frankenstein comics. It was my first time meeting someone who wrote the Flash and Kingdom Come had just finished. Thank you for all fun runs from both big companies! I was the only one in line who probably got 5 books signed where others had you sign full runs of stuff.

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People don’t talk about BTAS: “Heart of Ice” enough. One of the ten best Batman stories ever told. There’s also Detective 410, “A Vow From the Grave,” which is a textbook example from Denny O’Neil about how to tell a whodunit mystery in comics form. For Superman, by far the most underrated story is from Action 507-509, “The Miraculous Return of Jonathan Kent.” No spoilers!

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Thanks! And…huh. I’ve honestly never really thought about it. A story of that scope is hard to sustain with a b-lister regardless of how much I love them. Robby Reed is the BEST, but it’d be hard for him to carry 240 pages.

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Thank you. Physics came first, then the notion of creating. TBH, I never dreamed much of being a writer until I was in my mid-twenties–I didn’t think I had that many ideas in me! That was two thousand comic scripts ago.

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Since I’ll probably never tell that story because in the 30 years since I thought of it, variations of it have been told elsewhere–sure. Wally’s very first time travel trip as a kid was (against Barry’s advice) to go back a few days to save a classmate from a fatal accident. But he fails. So he tries again. And again. And again. And the more and more of him there are running around in that time period, still, nothing’s changing. He has to come to accept that you can’t change the past–you just have to keep moving forward.

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