Small Things in Comics that Tick You Off

I don’t know about any of you, but it’s always seemed ridiculous to me when superheroes wear high heels as part of their costume. I get it, it’s visually appealing, but surely running around in those HURTS. Of course, they probably work great for kicking people… Any small but common things in comics that irk you?

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Military uniforms that aren’t even close to being right. Not saying they have to be 100% accurate but something resembling a modern uniform would be nice. I mean Google it, it’s not that hard.

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You know the scene where the villain or someone does some tech stuff to connect to all tech around the world and we see them talking on those big screens in Time Square? How can they do that…WHEN THERE ARE NO FREAKING SPEAKERS ON THE TIMES SQUARE BILLBOARDS? So dumb.

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1000 I love yous in the new teen titans comic book series (1980)

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@Jay_Kay
Oh my god, I thought I was the only one who realized that! I suppose maybe they’re talking through all the smartphone speakers in the area…? Maybe…?

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Jean Loring.

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Dark color palettes. Should be the very rare exception, not the rule. Also, when the villain doesn’t see the gaping hole in their own plan.

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Unnatural dialogue can be quite annoying at times

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Thought bubbles that tell you exactly what the character is feeling at all times, even though the art already conveys it. It just makes the book such a drag to read through.

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They don’t put the date on the cover anymore, why?

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When I have no idea what the #$&! Is going on and I have to go online for “explanations”.

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When writers (Marv Wolfman and John Ostrander are particularly prone to this) write stories where you need to have read everything else they’ve ever written to properly understand what’s going on. No, Marv, I didn’t read The Vigilante, and I don’t want to. No, John, I didn’t read Firestorm or your Manhunter series, and I don’t really want to.

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@BatJamags
Oh, man. Yes. That is a particularly annoying one. No, Donny, I don’t like Venom. A Silver Surfer book? That sounds goo— NO! NO, THAT’S A SYMBIOTE! OH GOD PLEASE NO!

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For me its when the non-meta human heroes have their bodies scared beyond repair, then in the next story all is good. I understand that Batman is at the peak of human condition, but back when Bane broke his back at least the story took a bit to get Bruce back in the mantle. I want to see some consequences back in comics.

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Jokes that don’t land. If you can’t be funny, don’t try to be.

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@BatJamags/@Batwing52: In defense of the guys who do this in modern day, like Danny Coates, when the market makes it so it’s a minor miracle when a book reaches the 20s/30s, let alone higher, I can understand wanting to keep things going within specific books. An example that comes to mind is how Cullen Bunn was able to do his own Magneto story that stretched through his own Title, then post-IVX Uncanny X-Men, and then X-Men Blue.

@Derpy_Robin: A good example of this that comes to my mind is Judd Winick’s Under the Red Hood story, where Nightwing is in a leg-cast after being severely injured during the events of War Games.

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@Jay_Kay
Fair, but I think the difference is that that story is tracking one character through a handful of books you’d probably expect to see Magneto in anyway. I think that the audience for an off-the-walls Venom book is different than that of an indie-vibe, Tradd Moore-drawn Silver Surfer story (I mean, I’m definitely only in one camp and not the other). The thing that I have a problem with is more when a single writer takes all the stuff they’ve written, whether it adheres thematically or not, and glues it all together into this thing that’s worse than the sum of its parts. Jonathan Hickman is really the only time I’ve ever seen someone pull this off and have it be consistently good.

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Spelling mistakes that slip past the editors. I find one every two or three comics, and it drives me insane.

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Bendis smarmy snarky dialogue

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Voice-over dialogue that doesn’t match the action on the page. Seemingly the only way Grant Morrison knows how to write a comic book.

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