What is your preferred comic style?

As I was finishing one series and moving on to another, it brought up an interesting topic in our house: What is your preferred comic style?

Specifically, do you gravitate towards:

  • more text and less images

  • a healthy balance of text and images

  • less text and more images

I’ve been reading multiple storylines and each has a very different pace and feel based on that core concept. Some characters even benefit from less text in favor of “reading into the illustrations”.

I would love to hear from other comic fans - compare and contrast the styles - from the publish dates to the heroes and universes themselves. Are there beautifully drawn books that you just can’t get into because of the writing? Do huge blurbs of context distract from your enjoyment?

What unique storytelling have you noticed and which do you prefer?

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My preferred style would be something balanced. Dan Jurgens is an excellent example of this. His stories work WITH the art, thus you’re immersed in whatever world he’s working on.

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First I would prefer text that I could read
Red text on black is Unreadable to me.

I am visually impared
So
Less text
Smaller panels
Are my preferences

As is
I only have phone
Constantly
Switching between
Portrait
And Landscape
Zooming when have to

Hard to read comics digitally
But unable to go to comic book.store
None near me
Dont have room.for storage
Hard to read as well because of vision.

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Story first and hopefully not deconstructed.
Good art is a plus but secondary to me.

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Excellent points, @TurokSonOfStone1950! Accessibility is so important! Just today, I encountered the problems you mentioned with a few panels in Batman The New 52.

This particular issue uses a lot of interesting tactics like flipping the page and turning it on it’s side for added dimension and drama. Converting comics to digital form can present challenges but reading this book in paper form (which I have in my personal collection) is much more fun than struggling with the orientation on a device. Contrast is also key, which sometimes makes the older comics more appealing simply because they’re easier to read.

What’s an example of a smooth read for you?

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Great example, @superby1! I hadn’t read any of Dan Jurgens work but in a quick search, I see that he has worked on Booster Gold and Superman. Here is one piece that I think illustrates that balance you mentioned, which brings the reader through the story in a smooth linear fashion. It definitely keeps the reader engaged (and isn’t confusing or disjointed).

From The Adventures of Superman #456

I also like the choice of lettering in this first panel, using color and size effectively. It reminds me of Kamandi: The Last Boy on Earth.

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Good art is a plus but secondary to me.

Is there a comic you have read that had unappealing artwork, but such a well-written story that it overshadowed the poor illustrations?

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Yes…I bought a run of Nightwing Tpbs last year.
Written by Chuck Dixon.
The art of Scott McDaniel put me off…but the stories were great.

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Just looked at a few pages of Watchmen in Comixology whose reader is far superior to the one at DC Univetse. So much.so that I buy the books there rather than use the library at all.

The grid is such that I can see each panel in Portrait view and I can read the trxt easily even without glasses.

Because I read digitally full page or two page spreads with.lots of images and lots of text interspersed are very difficult for the browser to navigate or the reader to appreciate. They really requied a large format book, not a typical comic book.

I tend to have to skip those pages and my understanding of the story suffers due to that.

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WOW. I see what you mean. The artwork is aggressive and the speech bubbles are over-colored. The imagery detracts, rather than accompanying to create a cohesive narrative.

This seems like a solid case for what you mentioned, @superby1, where the story and art aren’t in unison.

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My eyeballs are friggin’ bleeding.

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My eyeballs are friggin’ bleeding.

:joy: I laughed so loud at this! :rofl:

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Another albatross was Frank Robbins on the Invaders back from 1970’s.

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Ouch, Frank Robbins. He was past his prime in the ‘70s. He was good back on his comic strip art for Johnny Hazard, but just wasn’t suited for superheroes.

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I like balanced storytelling where the art and text work together. Though I do have a soft spot for theChris Claremont’s and Don McGregor’s of the world. Ah, Bronze Age comics, where writers described everything depicted in the panels of the comic.

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Before knowing my own preferred comic style, I picked up Batman The New 52 at a local bookstore. I really enjoyed the engaging and detailed story introducing The Court of Owls. Flash forward to my recently finishing the Batman & Robin series. The artwork was amazing (excellent contrast), and with such limited dialogue, it told a deep and amazing tale of the relationship between Bruce and Damian Wayne. After completing that collection, I decided to revisit Batman (The New 52). It was surprisingly challenging to return to the verbose writing and “sketchier” artwork. I had previously loved this book! It was then that I realized how much those two factors matter. I was able to get back into the story and adjust to the new narrator’s “voice” and tone with the understanding that it read more like a book than a traditional comic.

Here are panels from each for comparison.

Batman & Robin

Batman The New 52

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This is a very good subject.
My brain might explode now…

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@AustinMace, I know your fan fiction is heavily worded due to the lack of imagery but what is your preferred reading style? I’d love for you to weigh in on this topic.

Do you have other thoughts on Batman The New 52 since that was your foundation?

This is a very good subject.
My brain might explode now…

Lol. Thank you! :relaxed:

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If done well the story and art should be seemless.

George Perez could compose great characterization. 7 people in a 2.5 x 3.5 panel and each acting or reacting in a way that so suited the individual character. It has a sense of the genre pairings of Valesquez.

Neal Adams has such a great sense of perspective geometry. His anatomy was flawless. He was to comics what Raphael was to renaissance painting. Simply beautiful and elegant.

Jack “The King” Kirby told the story so boldly through his art. He used the pure visual medium to go epic, over the top spectacle, but it was never actually over the top, it just hit you in the eyeballs in such a way that could not be ignored. You might love or hate the aesthetic, but the one thing you can’t do is ignore it. The Salvador Dali of comics.

So there are 3 very different styles, all of which I prefer. That combined with the limitations of the lousy paper and offset printing constraints. All three are masters of their craft.

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