What story do you wish you could read for the first time again?

I wish I could re-read Watchmen for the first time. I’ll never forget its ending. My jaw has never dropped that low.

I’d also love to be able to reread Rebirth from the beginning again and get excited about all the new directions that the series went.

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Bendis’s Powers is the one that comes to mind. It is much more fun on the first read not knowing what will happen. But at least that one is still going, so I can have that experience with the next story.

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Invasion!

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I was captivated by Batman between Tec 500-567, and Batman 334-400, as most of it was one continuous story flowing between the books. I’m going to read it again, but nothing will be like that first time.

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Identity Crisis. That scene with Robin man. One of the two comics I’ve read that made me well up with tears.

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For me it would be Rucka’s both runs on Wonder Woman and maybe Swamp Thing’s Anatomy Lesson. It’s the best thing Moore wrote (yes, better than Watchmen)

@ christopher.malmevik You got my attention. I wanted to read all Batman from Year One to NML, but I see it goes almost up to Y1 and if you recommend it I wanna read it. I see there are only 2 issues in each series missing from the stretch you write about so it’s great. I’m supposed to read one issue of one series and then one of the other or is it more complicated than that? And what should I start with?

All Star Superman or Watchmen, my two all time favorite comics!

This is a hard question.
Especially that up until 10 years ago I read comics monthly instead of by story arc.
So If I could sit down and read story arcs for the first time a few are:
Flash Vol. 1 275-284.
Uncanny X-Men Vol. 1 125-138.
Death Of Superman-Reign Of The Supermen.

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Mister Miracle by Tom King

Crisis on Infinite Earths, Superman: For all Seasons, Ten Nights of the Beast, and Kingdom Come

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@BewareThePowerGuyGardnersMight : When I got into Batman, I needed a jumping on point, and I arbitrarily started with Detective 500, as it was an anniversary special, and it seemed a good place. I then chose the Batman that came out around that publication date which was the Ra’s Al Ghul story from circa 332-337 (I’m guessing on the numbers as it’s been awhile). What I didn’t know was shortly after that, the books started melding into one continuous story. I’m always a big fan of “to be continued” types of stories, as opposed to single issue stories, so I was fascinated by this sudden change from late 70s early 80s batman. This ran through Gerry Conway’s books, into Doug Moensch’s, culminating right around Batman 400, which coincided with Crisis. If you’re familiar with Gerry’s Spider-man stories, it was ver ysimilar. There’d be a villain in maybe 2-3 parts, and then supporting characters that have a plotline that goes on for dozens of books. Doug continued this, which led into the introduction of Jason Todd as the second Robin (long before his death). Let me know if you have other questions, as I’m very excited about this era, and can talk forever, haha.

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@christopher.malmevik I see that the story with Ra’s you wrote about is #335, the last one of a string of Marv Wolfman stories (#328-335) so Wolfman is where I’m gonna start. I also figured that I’m supposed to read Batman #333 and then DC #500 because that’s the order storylines in Conway’s run are jumping from book to book. Thanks for your help. Haven’t read Conway’s Spidey but heard great things about it. And I’m also a fan of Moench run during Knightfall so it became one of my priority readings now.

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James Robinson’s Starman run, without a doubt. It’s a wonderful series and a huge influence on where I’d like to take my writing. If I could read it again with a fresh perspective, I think I’d feel the same way I do now.

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Starman( My second favorite comic of all time )is a great choice @Superby1, but I’d have to go with Sandman, my favorite comic of all time.

Hush. I first read Batman issue 614 (part 7) after finding out Jim Lee was drawing BM. Then I couldn’t find the last few issues because of them selling out and lack of comic shops ment no back issues. Then when the trades came out I could only find Hush vol2, so I read the last half of the story before the first half. I didn’t read the first half of Hush until at least a year after reading the second half.

Len Wein’s original runs on Swamp Thing and The Phantom Stranger. The best the Bronze Age had to offer.

Omega Men by Tom King

Death the High Cost of Living
Neil Gaiman

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@TurokSonOfStone1950
Such great choices. I LOVE DTHCoL. So much.

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