Who would win, Grant Morrison or Alan Moore?

Two of the greatest comic writers of the British Invasion who’ve had a long standing rivalry and slight antagonism towards each other for years. What wold you say are their strengths and weaknesses are as writers and who’s work do you prefer?

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This’ll be interesting!

Morrison is A Much better writer overall IMHO. I Love how he embraces the Laveshly Ludicrous side of comics.

But Moore’s contributions can’t be down played either. His Swamp Thing run & Watchmen are Still phenomenal!

I just wish both could’ve put their differences aside and learned to get along better. If they worked together they could make the craziest comic ever made!!:sunglasses:

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Both stink

In a writing competition? Alan Moore. He actually writes good stories most of the time. Grant Morrison will occasionally write something good, like Doom Patrol or All Star Superman, but most of the time he delivers confusing mess like Final Crisis that I think even his fans know deep down are bad.

In a personality contest? Um… is there a third option? I find them both weird and annoying in their own ways.

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Moore is an insufferable butt, but a writer who helped change the industry. Morrison throws everything at the wall, some sticks some doesn’t but he’s had long stretches of successfully building a series. Moore’s Swamp Thing is the only run of his that compares. Moore is George Mika, Morrison is Oscar Robertson, neither is Julius Erving.

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I’m not an expert on either, but from my limited experience I find Morrison overrated. He has some interesting ideas but doesn’t seem to know how to make them narratively satisfying. I wish he’d done a few less tabs of LSDs.

He’s still great though. Just overrated.

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When I first started reading comics, Alan Moore was #1, but now Grant may have overtaken him. Moore is more planned; it’s denser, and comes with the weight of a semi. Morrison is way more free wheeling, and delivers way more fun for me. But you can really see the differences in their scripts. Moore will write whole pages describing one panel, wheras a Morrison script, especially the later the example, will be very sparse. Morrison seems to have a truer collaboration with his artists as well. Moore seems fairly controlling but at least respectful of the artist’s half of the work. That gives Moore a bit more consistency while Morrison can rise and fall with his artist. So, as it sounds now, more excited for the next Green Lantern than League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, so giving it to Morrison right now.

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Final Crisis and its spiritual sequel Multiversity are Awesome actually! It’s not Morrison’s fault so many don’t have the capacity to understand the general metatextual nature of his works.

Then again given how often fans of every medium of storytelling complain when something doesn’t hold their hand all the way through I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.:expressionless:

I blame Shonen Anime & Manga. So many of my fellow Millinals and Gen-Xers before them got so comfortable with excessive exposition that any form of symbolism. Allegory, Metaphor, deconstruction or deconextualization is lost on them.

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I don’t much like either of them, honestly. That said, I much prefer Moore. Moore’s writing has a certain bitterness to it that’s not to my taste, but his plots are always solid and he has a lot of genuinely brilliant, creative ideas, especially in his Green Lantern work. Morrison feels like he doesn’t really care too much about the plot as long as he’s being clever and can throw in some cool moments. Even his JLA run felt like it was spending too much time to be “big” and “cool” to really think about things like characterization or logical consistency.

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Moore strikes me as the better writer, while Morrison is the more personable.

I’ll happily read comics written by Alan Moore, but would I want to spend time with him? No.

I’ll happily read Morrison books, and I’d love to spend time with him.

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People seem to think that if you don’t like Grant Morrison, then it’s because you’re stupid and can’t understand it. I understand it just fine. I understand all the meta layers and everything. But just because something has layers like that doesn’t mean the layers are well written. And in many of Morrison’s stories, I find they are definitely not.

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I agree with Squid. Also though I love continuity and find it to be a strength of the medium, it’s not a strength of the story if it only makes sense with a fan wiki open in your browser. A coherent story should come first and all the cute references should be in service to the story. Also, consider Watchmen. It has many layers, commentaries, angles and interpretations, but you can read it as a face level superhero story and it works just fine. Final Crisis is an unsatisfying mess on the surface level which I believe why people focus on the possible meta meaning of the piece as a supposed strength.

I remember when I read The Return of Bruce Wayne and realized that an issue with the him interacting with the Founding Fathers in the American Revolution tied into a Batman story with Riddler I loved from the late eighties. “Wow, that’s awesome,” I thought, and then I went back to reading Bruce jump from time period to time period in an utterly nonsensical story with a Deus ex machina ending.

That’s Morrison in a nutshell for me. Great ideas with a mediocre execution.

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As only a slight tangent, I think Scott Snyder is getting a little Morrisony with throw big ideas out there for the sake of big ideas.

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@msgtv He himself has said he’s a big Morrison fan and was inspired by him. I like his writing more though.

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Squid his writing is better, but he comes up with the silly cool idea of a giant JL robot ala Power Rangers which last one page. A recent JL issue (spoiler) has an evil version of them and Legion of Doom as weathered heroes. The LD parts of two issues, to me that was an idea worth exploring.

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When it comes to DC/Vertigo writers associated with the “British Invasion” of the 1980s-90s, I rank them as so:

Alan Moore
Neil Gaiman
Warren Ellis
Garth Ennis
Grant Morrison
Jamie Delano
Paul Jenkins
Peter Milligan

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Moore is better when it comes to structure and technique but Morrison understands the characters and the genre better and is much more imaginative.

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Moore is definitely usually the easier read Morrison tends to get pretty wacky and crazy in a good way but sometime it makes the books harder to get through

Moore is the superior story teller but a complete butt. I found a documentary on him and had to turn it off rather than to continue listening to him.

Morrison is pretty hit or miss and I don’t get really excited when he’s announced on a project. Seems like a solid dude th though.